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-Let me give some background first- My assignment is to take a given senario (my dog buddy sees a frog in the backyard and if he is hungry he eats it, if not he will play with it, if he's already eaten two he will let it go. If he sees a cat or a squirrel he will bark at it, if another dog he chases it, if a coyote he will cry for help, any other animal he will watch it). Then we are to have it count the number of animals in a given night and record it into another file along with Buddy's reactions to said animals. A person is to be able to enter a date into the recorded file and pull up the animals and interactions for said date.-

Here is the code as I have it currently:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>

using namespace std;

class animal{
public:
   animal();
   ~animal();
   virtual string interactWithBuddy()//all derived classes use this
   {
        return "Buddy ";
   } 

};
animal::animal()
{
}
class frog: public animal
{

 public:
         string interactWithBuddy()
         {
              return "Buddy \n";
         }
         static int ID()
         {
             return 1;//ID assigned to frog for randomization purposes
         }         
};
class dog: public animal
{                
   public:
         string interactWithBuddy()
         {
              return "Buddy chased the dog\n";
         }
         static int ID()
         {
             return 2;//ID assigned to dog for randomization purposes
         }

};
class cat: public animal
{
  public:
         string interactWithBuddy()
         {
              return "Buddy barked at the cat \n";
         }
         static int ID()
         {
             return 3;//ID assigned to cat for randomization purposes
         }
};
class coyote: public animal
{
  public:
         string interactWithBuddy()
         {
              return "Buddy cried for help when he seen the coyote \n";
         }
         static int ID()
         {
             return 4;//ID assigned to coyote for randomization purposes
         }
};
class squirrel: public animal
{
  public:
         string interactWithBuddy()
         {
                return "Buddy barked at the squirrel \n";
         } 
         static int ID()
         {
             return 5;//ID assigned to squirrel for randomization purposes
         }
};
class otherAnimal: public animal
{
  public:
         string interactWithBuddy()
         {
                return "Buddy watched the animal \n";
         } 
         static int ID()
         {
             return 6; //ID assigned to otherAnimal for randomization purposes
         }
};
int main ()
{
srand(time(0)); //intializes the random seed
int number;
animal * a; // pointer to animal 
  std::cout << (rand() % 6 + 1) <<std::endl;  //return random number between 1-6

 // loop to assign the random number output a proper animal ID
  if (number == frog::ID()) 
  {
        a = new frog;
        a->interactWithBuddy();

  }
  else if (number == dog::ID())
  {
       a = new dog;
       a->interactWithBuddy();
  }
  else if (number == cat::ID())
  {
       a = new cat;
       a->interactWithBuddy();
  }
  else if (number == coyote::ID())
  {
       a = new coyote;
       a->interactWithBuddy();
  }
  else if (number == squirrel::ID())
  {
     a = new squirrel;
     a->interactWithBuddy();
  }
  else if (number == otherAnimal::ID()) 
  {
      a = new otherAnimal;
      a->interactWithBuddy();
  }

return 0;
}

Compiles without errors but when I code check it for the output I get an error that reads "Line 100: warning: 'number' is used uninitialized in this function"

share|improve this question
    
It seems like you want the parent class to print "My ID number is\n"? That aside, you should probably delete all those pointers at the end. –  Mysticial Aug 27 '12 at 2:03
    
Could you clarify your first question? I guess you want something to happen in main(). Do you want it to choose an animal type at random, then construct an animal of that type and have it interactWithBuddy()? As for the interaction, and storing the results, you should tackle those problems separately: get interactWithBuddy() to work without the loop, then put it in the loop. –  Beta Aug 27 '12 at 2:07
    
@Beta what I need it to do is take the ID that I assigned to each class of the animals and construct a loop in the main that I can have it randomly choose one of the numbers 1-6 to catalog what animals come into the yard and night and what the interaction would be with buddy. I am not sure what you are saying with the "interactWithBuddy() to work without the loop, the put it in the loop." –  Angie Aug 27 '12 at 2:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For your first question, this may take a few tries.

First, suppose you just wanted to choose an animal randomly:

srand(time(0)); //initializes the random seed
int number = rand() % 6 + 1;
animal *a;
if(number == 1)
{
  a = new frog;
}
if(number == 2)
{
  a = new dog;
}
...

a->interactWithBuddy();
delete(a); // Don't forget to delete what you create with "new".

That works, but the ID numbers are "hard-coded" here, it doesn't use the ID() function you wrote. If you want to use ID(), you could have one of each animal and see which one matches number:

frog Kermit;
dog Ralph;
cat Felix;
coyote Loki;
squirrel Sparticus;

if(number == kermit.ID())
{
  kermit.interactWithBuddy();
}
if(number == Ralph.ID())
{
  Ralph.interactWithBuddy();
}
...

You have to have each animal beforehand, because you can't ask the animal for ID() until the animal exists. But there is a way to code ID() so that you can ask for the ID of a type of animal before you have one of that animal, by using "static":

class animal{
public:
  animal();
  ~animal();
  void interactWithBuddy();
};

class frog: public animal
{
public:
  ...
  static int ID()
  {
    return 1;
  }
};

...

int main()
{
  ...
  if(number == frog::ID())
  {
    a = new frog;
  }
  ...
}

This also solves your second problem because you no longer have the problematic OD() in animal.

Is that sufficient? There are other possibilities.

EDIT:

You forgot int number = rand() % 6 + 1;.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried it as suggested and it compiles until the main function: I then get "a is undeclared" so I switched and tried cout << "frog" << endl; after the intial loop statement. this returns the error of ISO C++ forbids comparison between pointer and integer. and 'class animal has no member named 'ID'-nevermind the second part as I figured why it was saying the no member named ID. But still need to figure out the loop part please. –  Angie Aug 27 '12 at 3:33
1  
@Angie: I gave three examples, which one are you trying? –  Beta Aug 27 '12 at 3:36
    
hmmm...i did all three. the static int in the derived classes and the "if(number == frog::ID()) a = new frog;} –  Angie Aug 27 '12 at 3:37
    
@Angie: in the third one I omitted some code ("..."). In main you will need animal *a; and the number stuff near the top, and a->interactWithBuddy(); near the bottom. –  Beta Aug 27 '12 at 3:40
    
I now get an error that states cannot call member function 'virtual int frog::ID()' without object. Banging my battered brain on the table here I am sorry. –  Angie Aug 27 '12 at 3:46
virtual int ID() //allows declared value in subclass
{
        return ("My ID number is\n");
}

The int means that the function returns an integer. But it actually returns a string (const char *). The compiler has no idea how to convert the const char * you returned into the int you were supposed to return.

share|improve this answer

As for the second question, you are returning a cstring from the function but you have declared the return type of the function as integer. Anything in between double quotes "" is considered as constant string. Change the return type of your function or either return an integer

share|improve this answer

Your function is declared to return an integer - you are returning a null terminated string

Instead in the base class maybe return an error type ID like

 virtual int ID()
 {
     return -1;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
I did as suggested an now get a linker error that states [linker error] undefined reference to 'animal::animal(); –  Angie Aug 27 '12 at 2:17
    
You need to an actual function body try animal() {}; and you may also need this for the destructor too. All you are doing is telling the compile there is a constructor but you are not defining one for it to call –  Adrian Cornish Aug 27 '12 at 2:22

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