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I've been looking around a fair bit for an answer. I'm going to make a series of my own string functions like my_strcmp(), my_strcat(), etc.

Does strcmp() work through each index of two arrays of characters and if the ASCII value is smaller at an identical index of two strings, that string is there alphabetically greater and therefore a 0 or 1 or 2 is returned? I guess what Im asking is, does it use the ASCII values of characters to return these results?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

[REVISED]

OK, so I have come up with this... it works for all cases except when the second string is greater than the first.

Any tips?

int my_strcmp(char s1[], char s2[])
{   
    int i = 0;
    while ( s1[i] != '\0' )
    {
        if( s2[i] == '\0' ) { return 1; }
        else if( s1[i] < s2[i] ) { return -1; }
        else if( s1[i] > s2[i] ) { return 1; }
        i++;
    }   
    return 0;
}


int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int result = my_strcmp(argv[1], argv[2]);

    printf("Value: %d \n", result);

    return 0;

}
share|improve this question
2  
Why don't you just look at an implementation (glibc's, or any other - search for "strcmp source code")? (And for the return value and specification, read the man page or POSIX.) –  Mat Aug 27 '12 at 4:44
    
@DizzyChamp strcmp uses a lexicographical order –  oldrinb Aug 27 '12 at 4:46

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The pseudo-code "implementation" of strcmp would go something like:

define strcmp (s1, s2):
    p1 = address of first character of str1
    p2 = address of first character of str2

    while contents of p1 not equal to null:
        if contents of p2 equal to null: 
            return 1

        if contents of p2 greater than contents of p1:
            return -1

        if contents of p1 greater than contents of p2:
            return 1

        advance p1
        advance p2

    if contents of p2 not equal to null:
        return -1

    return 0

That's basically it. Each character is compared in turn an a decision is made as to whether the first or second string is greater, based on that character.

Only if the characters are identical do you move to the next character and, if all the characters were identical, zero is returned.

Note that you may not necessarily get 1 and -1, the specs say that any positive or negative value will suffice, so you should always check the return value with < 0, > 0 or == 0.

Turning that into real C would be relatively simple:

int myStrCmp (const char *s1, const char *s2) {
    const unsigned char *p1 = (const unsigned char *)s1;
    const unsigned char *p2 = (const unsigned char *)s2;

    while (*p1 != '\0') {
        if (*p2 == '\0') return  1;
        if (*p2 > *p1)   return -1;
        if (*p1 > *p2)   return  1;

        p1++;
        p2++;
    }

    if (*p2 != '\0') return -1;

    return 0;
}

Also keep in mind that "greater" in the context of characters is not necessarily based on simple ASCII ordering for all string functions.

C has a concept called 'locales' which specify (among other things) collation, or ordering of the underlying character set and you may find, for example, that the characters a, á, à and ä are all considered identical. This will happen for functions like strcoll.

share|improve this answer
    
strcmp has nothing to do with locale. It compares byte values as unsigned char. –  R.. Aug 27 '12 at 5:05
    
Sorry, @R, I didn't mean specifically strcmp, rather I was talking about the string functions as a whole. I'll clarify. –  paxdiablo Aug 27 '12 at 5:12
    
Most of the functions whose names begin with str have nothing to do with locale. –  R.. Aug 27 '12 at 5:13
1  
Except strcoll and strxfrm, which are locale-sensitive. strcoll is basically locale-aware strcmp, and strxfrm transforms strings so that strcmp will perform locale-aware comparisons. Of course, you're probably still better off using a real internationalization library if possible. –  nneonneo Aug 27 '12 at 5:23
1  
nevermind - "The sign of a nonzero value returned by the comparison functions memcmp, strcmp, and strncmp is determined by the sign of the difference between the values of the first pair of characters (both interpreted as unsigned char) that differ in the objects being compared." ... good to know –  technosaurus May 12 '14 at 4:28

Here is the BSD implementation:

int
strcmp(s1, s2)
    register const char *s1, *s2;
{
    while (*s1 == *s2++)
        if (*s1++ == 0)
            return (0);
    return (*(const unsigned char *)s1 - *(const unsigned char *)(s2 - 1));
}

Once there is a mismatch between two characters, it just returns the difference between those two characters.

share|improve this answer
4  
It's worth noting that it doesn't always return the difference between the two differing characters; it is actually permitted to return any integer provided the sign is the same as the difference between the bytes. A misunderstanding of this implementation detail (in the related memcmp function) resulted in a real-world security vulnerability in MySQL. –  nneonneo Aug 27 '12 at 4:52
    
@nneonneo That's an excellent point. Implementing it via "difference between characters" is good, but relying on that as a user is bad. –  chrisaycock Aug 27 '12 at 4:55
2  
As always, RTFM before using a function. Even the C standard is blatantly clear over how strcmp() behaves: The strcmp function returns an integer greater than, equal to, or less than zero, accordingly as the string pointed to by s1 is greater than, equal to, or less than the string pointed to by s2. That's it, no further guarantees. –  Lundin Aug 27 '12 at 6:44

Here is my version, written for small microcontroller applications, MISRA-C compliant. The main aim with this code was to write readable code, instead of the one-line goo found in most compiler libs.

int8_t strcmp (const uint8_t* s1, const uint8_t* s2)
{
  while ( (*s1 != '\0') && (*s1 != *s2) )
  {
    s1++; 
    s2++;
  }

  return (int8_t)( (int16_t)*s1 - (int16_t)*s2 );
}

Note: the code assumes 16 bit int type.

share|improve this answer
1  
Note: The && (*s2 != '\0') is not needed. –  chux Mar 15 at 20:48

It uses the byte values of the characters, returning a negative value if the first string appears before the second (ordered by byte values), zero if they are equal, and a positive value if the first appears after the second. Since it operates on bytes, it is not encoding-aware.

For example:

strcmp("abc", "def") < 0
strcmp("abc", "abcd") < 0 // null character is less than 'd'
strcmp("abc", "ABC") > 0 // 'a' > 'A' in ASCII
strcmp("abc", "abc") == 0

More precisely, as described in the strcmp Open Group specification:

The sign of a non-zero return value shall be determined by the sign of the difference between the values of the first pair of bytes (both interpreted as type unsigned char) that differ in the strings being compared.

Note that the return value may not be equal to this difference, but it will carry the same sign.

share|improve this answer

This code is equivalent, shorter, and more readable:

int8_t strcmp (const uint8_t* s1, const uint8_t* s2)
{
    while( (*s1!='\0') && (*s1==*s2) ){
        s1++; 
        s2++;
    }

    return (int8_t)*s1 - (int8_t)*s2;
}

We only need to test for end of s1, because if we reach the end of s2 before end of s1, the loop will terminate (since *s2 != *s1).

The return expression calculates the correct value in every case, provided we are only using 7-bit (pure ASCII) characters. Careful thought is needed to produce correct code for 8-bit characters, because of the risk of integer overflow.

share|improve this answer
    
Why post a solution that is correct for "only using 7-bit (pure ASCII) characters"? Better to post a solution that works per the C spec. –  chux Mar 15 at 20:55
    
The cast to int8_t on the last line is superfluous, because each operand will get implicitly promoted to int anyhow. –  Lundin Mar 16 at 7:58

This is how I implemented my strcmp: it works like this: it compares first letter of the two strings, if it is identical, it continues to the next letter. If not, it returns the corresponding value. It is very simple and easy to understand: #include

//function declaration:
int strcmp(char string1[], char string2[]);

int main()
{
    char string1[]=" The San Antonio spurs";
    char string2[]=" will be champins again!";
    //calling the function- strcmp
    printf("\n number returned by the strcmp function: %d", strcmp(string1, string2));
    getch();
    return(0);
}

/**This function calculates the dictionary value of the string and compares it to another string.
it returns a number bigger than 0 if the first string is bigger than the second
it returns a number smaller than 0 if the second string is bigger than the first
input: string1, string2
output: value- can be 1, 0 or -1 according to the case*/
int strcmp(char string1[], char string2[])
{
    int i=0;
    int value=2;    //this initialization value could be any number but the numbers that can be      returned by the function
    while(value==2)
    {
        if (string1[i]>string2[i])
        {
            value=1;
        }
        else if (string1[i]<string2[i])
        {
            value=-1;
        }
        else
        {
            i++;
        }
    }
    return(value);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This answer in incorrect. Per the C spec, the compares string1[i]>string2[i], string1[i]<string2[i] should be an unsigned char compare. –  chux Mar 15 at 20:58
    
This code is incorrect because when the strings are equal, it hangs the program, and while doing so reads past the null termination and therefore likely out-of-bounds, causing undefined behavior. –  Lundin Mar 16 at 9:33

Here is a recursive one that I use in my Public Domain C library which reduces well on most architectures when optimized and may be helpful in understanding recursion.

int strcmp(const char *a,const char *b){
  return (! *a || *a!=*b) ?
      (const unsigned char)*a - (const unsigned char)*b :
      strcmp(++a,++b);
}

For recursion you always want to handle the end case first thus: if (! *a )) return ; Thus an empty string or mismatch return the unsigned comparison This would happen if after you recursed to the end of the strings. Then you handle the comparison return (*a!=*b) ? *a-*b : strcmp(++a,++b); Which returns the difference if the current character doesn't match or recurses to the next letter in each string (note the ++preincrement, which moves the pointer to the string one character BEFORE strcmp is called) The cast to const unsigned char is to enforce the standard that non-ascii > ascii.

share|improve this answer
    
Note: | *b) is not needed. –  chux Mar 15 at 20:56
    
Bug: if b is shorter than a then the strings can't be equal. Furthermore, there is absolutely no reason to use recursion for this: all you do is create an unreadable, incredibly slow program that consume far more memory than needed. What if the stings are several hundred characters long? If you are lucky the compiler can de-crappify the recursion into an inlined loop, but I wouldn't count on it. Better to not write crappy code in the first place. –  Lundin Mar 16 at 7:31
    
And why do you cast each char to const unsigned char? It doesn't make any sense. *a - *b will implicitly promote each operand to int anyhow. Luckily, otherwise the code would be even more broken. As for now, all that cast does is to tell the reader that you don't quite know what your own code is doing... –  Lundin Mar 16 at 7:43
    
@technosaurus No it doesn't. All the standard says is (C11 7.24.4.2) "The strcmp function compares the string pointed to by s1 to the string pointed to by s2. The strcmp function returns an integer greater than, equal to, or less than zero, accordingly as the string pointed to by s1 is greater than, equal to, or less than the string pointed to by s2." And you can't even do comparisons on a character type in C, because of implicit type promotions ("the usual arithmetic conversions"). –  Lundin Mar 16 at 9:06
    
@technosaurus I have no idea what that nonsense link is, but it isn't the C standard ISO 9899:2011. The C standard isn't an open standard but you can download the C11 draft free. And if you knew how implicit type promotions work in C, you would know that the cast to unsigned char doesn't make any sense. Here's what applies to the minus operator C11 6.5.6/4 :"If both operands have arithmetic type, the usual arithmetic conversions are performed on them." Then see C11 6.3.1.8 if you don't know what "the usual arithmetic conversions" means. –  Lundin Mar 16 at 9:13

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