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I'm getting strange behavior bounds checking a member std::array with mingw (gcc 4.7.0) with the following code

#include <iostream>
#include <array>

class testClass
{
    std::array<int, 2> testArray;

    public:
        testClass();
        void func() const;

};

testClass::testClass() : testArray({{1, 2}})
{
}

void testClass::func() const
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
        std::cout << testArray.at(i) << '\n' << testArray[i] << '\n';       
}


int main()
{
    testClass test;
    test.func();
}

Output is

0
1
0
2

The error seems to be related to optimization, as it only crops up when compiled with -O, I tried the individual flags enabled by -O but couldn't narrow it down any further. Making the function non-const also fixes the issue. Could this be a bug or am I missing something?

*edit

Narrowed it down, looks like a bug in the const version of .at()

#include <iostream>
#include <array>

int main()
{
    std::array<int, 2> const testArray = {1, 2};

    for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
        std::cout << testArray.at(i) << '\n' << testArray[i] << '\n';       
}

Same output as above compiled with -std=c++11 -O using mingw 4.7.0 on Windows Xp sp3 and Windows 7 sp1.

*edit 2

Same output again

#include <iostream>
#include <array>

int main()
{
    typedef std::array<int, 2> Tarray;
    Tarray test = {1, 2};

    for (int i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
        std::cout << const_cast<Tarray const*>(&test)->at(i) << '\n' << test.at(i) << '\n';     
}
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4  
It definitely looks like a bug to me. –  David Schwartz Aug 27 '12 at 4:58
    
It produces a different output for me... –  dasblinkenlight Aug 27 '12 at 4:59
    
g++ 4.8.0 (experimental), all codes works well with -O0 only. With other -O flags gives such warning: "<anonymous> is used uninitialized in this function [-Wuninitialized]" –  soon Aug 27 '12 at 5:29
1  
I cannot reproduce that with gcc 4.7 or a 4.8 snapshot, both on an ubuntu linux. –  juanchopanza Aug 27 '12 at 5:40
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is part of array header

#ifdef __EXCEPTIONS
  constexpr const_reference
  at(size_type __n) const
  {
return __n < _Nm ? 
       _M_instance[__n] : throw out_of_range(__N("array::at"));
  }
#else
  const_reference
  at(size_type __n) const
  {
if (__n >= _Nm)
  std::__throw_out_of_range(__N("array::at"));
return _M_instance[__n];
  }
#endif

Undef __EXCEPTIONS in main file(or change #ifdef to #ifndef in array) leads to correct output. I don't know, this is right solution or not, but it works.

UPD: I change the code in my array's header to

#ifdef __EXCEPTIONS
  constexpr const_reference
  at(size_type __n) const
  {
return __n < _Nm ? 
       _M_instance[__n] : (throw out_of_range(__N("array::at"))),
                          _M_instance[__n];
   /*return __n < _Nm ? 
            _M_instance[__n] : throw out_of_range(__N("array::at"));*/
  }
#else
  const_reference
  at(size_type __n) const
  {
if (__n >= _Nm)
  std::__throw_out_of_range(__N("array::at"));
return _M_instance[__n];
  }
#endif

Now everything is working correctly

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7  
The bug in the unpatched header is that __n < _Nm ? _M_instance[__n] : throw out_of_range(__N("array::at")) evaluates to a prvalue temporary (because a conditional operator must evaluate to a prvalue if one of the operands is a throw expression - C++11 5.16/2). This temporary's lifetime is only until the end of the full expression of the return statement (C++11 12.2/5). So the at() function returns a const reference to something that is no longer valid - the result is undefined behavior. –  Michael Burr Aug 27 '12 at 7:24
    
a horrible bug (return a? b:throw c;) --- wouldn't have thought that this sort of beginners error comes with any shipped c++ container. –  Walter Aug 27 '12 at 7:57
3  
@MichaelBurr: I think it may be worth an answer of its own! –  Matthieu M. Aug 27 '12 at 9:38
1  
@Walter, why do you think it's a beginner's mistake? There's nothing inherently wrong with (return a? b:throw c;) , if the function didn't return by reference that would be fine. It was written that way on purpose to allow array::at to be constexpr (but as Michael points out, it doesn't work.) –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 28 '12 at 8:11
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