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I read in a book that instance members are accessible only after the super constructor runs.

I stumbled upon the following code:

class Parent {

    Parent() {
        printIt();
    }

    void printIt() {
        System.out.println("I'm in a overridden method. Great.");
    }
}

class Child extends Parent {

    int i = 100;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Parent p = new Child();
        p.printIt();
    }

    void printIt() {
        System.out.print(i + " ");
    }
}

and it prints:

0 100

My question would be:

If instance members are accessible only after the super constructor runs, then why is it that upon execution of the printIt( ) method of class Parent, (which in fact is Child's printIt( ) due to polymorphism), it was able to access the uninitialized instance variable i of Child even though the constructor of Parent has not yet finished executing?

What am I missing?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I read in a book that instance members are accessible only after the super constructor runs.

Your book is wrong (if that's what it really says). They are accessible at all times once construction has started. However they are not initialized until after the super constructor has run. So what you printed was the default value: null, zero, or false.

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2  
"They are accessible at all times once construction has started. However they are not initialized until after the super constructor has run. " --- Great point. +1 –  Anuj Balan Aug 27 '12 at 5:29
    
Very well said @EJP. Things are becoming clearer now. –  amor214 Aug 27 '12 at 5:34

it was able to access the uninitialized instance variable i of Child even though the constructor of Parent has not yet finished executing?

You were able to access it, but before it was initialized (which is not what you usually want).

The "space" for the variable is already in place (you do have an instance after all), but the code that initializes it to its proper starting value has not yet run. So it will all be null, false, and 0.

So as a result, a method in the class ("printIt") is being called in an awkward point of the lifecycle of the object (before the initializers have run, on a "half-finished" instance). This is what the warning you read wanted to say.

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I think your example is misleading you. In fact super constructor runs before, and you can see this with a modified example like below. Also as a clarification, member values are accessible but they might not be yet initialized.

class Parent {

    int i = 0;

    Parent() {
        i = 1;
        printIt();
    }

    void printIt() {
        System.out.println("I'm in a overridden method. Great. i = " + i);
    }
}

class Child extends Parent {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Parent p = new Child();
        p.printIt();
    }

    void printIt() {
        System.out.print(i + " ");
    }
}
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Overriding takes place in your code. Object is taken into consideration at runtime. So, printIt() of Child was called. At this time, value of 'i' is not known, but has default value of '0', as it is an instance variable. Once that is done, p.printIt() is called, printIt() of Child is called and by this time int i=100 is read and it prints 100.

Thus output should and will be 0 100

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Fields in an object are initialised to a default value of null or 0 when the object is first created, then your constructor actually runs, which calls the super constructor as its first step.

Sadly you can't work around this by writing your constructor as

Child() {
  i=100;
  super();
}

And without being able to do this there's no way to set the childs i field before it gets used in the override method call from the parents constructor.

It's worth knowing a few ways to work around this though:

On approach is to hide i behind an abstract getter, and provide an static factory function that creates new instances overriding getI.

public class Child extends Parent {

   protected abstract getI();

   @Override void printIt() {
     System.out.print("i = " + i);
   }

   static Child create(final int i) {
      return new Child() {
         int getI() { return i; }
      }
   }
}

Child child = Child.create(100);

Another approach is to decouple the printIt from the Parent/Child heirachy. Then you can create the printer before the Parent constructor is called. (Often this kind of trick can be used to gut Child entirely leaving you only with the Parent class and the components - i.e. you end up using composition rather than inheritance.)

class Parent {
   public interface Printer {
     void printIt();
   }

   public class DefaultPrinter extends Printer {
     @Override void printIt() { 
       System.out.println("Default Printer...");
     }
   }

   Parent() {
     this(new DefaultPrinter());
   }

   Parent(Printer p ) {
     this.printer = p;
     printIt();
   }

   void printIt() {
     p.printIt();
   }
}

public class Child extends Parent {
   public class ChildPrinter implements Parent.Printer {
     final int i = 100;
     @Override void printIt() {
       System.out.println("i = "+i);
     }
   }

   Child() {
     super( new Printer() );
   }
}
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