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I don't have a specific situation I'm dealing with, so consider this more of a general question. If language is important, answers can tend more toward PHP.

If I have a large array (or other data type) of data which I require in multiple functions, that does not change, how should I use that data? For example, maybe I have an array that looks like

$states = array(
                "AL" => "Alabama",
                     ...
                "WY" => "Wyoming"
                );

Obviously, this array won't need to change anytime soon. If I have five functions that have to use the above array, what is the best solution? My three ideas are:

  • Declare it as a global constant

This one seems the most straightforward, however some people I've talked to seem to recommend shying away from using global variables. Any insight here would be appreciated.

  • Pass it into the function

This one seems like a bad idea to me because it never changes, and function parameters should be for variables, right? Not to mention having to pass it into a function that doesn't use it, just so it can be used by another function. That seems like a poor practice.

  • Have it be returned by a function

This is one that I haven't seen used a lot, but I've used myself a couple of times for passing mysqli_connect() information to multiple functions. It worked quite well. Is this regarded as poor practice? Should I just suck it up and use a global constant?

I realize that using a global constant sounds obvious, but I've heard (and read) more than one mantra like, "if you're declaring globals, you're doing it wrong" and stuff like that. Can anyone explain why this might be?

Thanks for any insight that you can give me, guys.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My general advice would be to build a "service provider" class, which is analogous to your "return it from a function" option. Here are some specific thoughts:

  • Declare it as a global constant

First, constants can only be scalar values, so you cannot technically have an "constant" array. Second, what you say is almost always true: globals are a hint that there is a better way (with some exception).

  • Pass it into the function

If they are actually constant (in the "real world" sense, not the computer-science sense), then you are right, passing to a function should be considered code-clutter (unless the functions should be abstracted from the knowledge of the "global" value, but that's a domain-specific architecture choice.

  • Have it be returned by a function

Ding Ding! The reason is essentially this: Anyone can access these to "read", but only the "function" can "write". I put "function" in quotes because it could also be a class or singleton object instance. Basically, you provide a semantically appropriate provider of this static information.

One of the benefits of this approach is that you may only need the data quite seldom in a long-running program. The service provider may in that case be written to fetch the values from some out-of-memory persistence and free the memory when it is not needed anymore. Nobody else should need to be responsible for that memory management. Along the same lines, imagine that the project grows and these datum need to be loaded from a database instead of a static array... if you have centralized the access, this is remarkably easy to facilitate and you don't need to have a huge heap of memory lying around for the entire length of your program's execution holding values that are almost never accessed.

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Thanks for such a thorough answer! When would using globals be appropriate? Like for mathematical constant or something else? –  enkrypt0r Aug 27 '12 at 6:03
    
The exceptions are highly dependent on the nature of the app and the environment in which it will be deployed. For PHP and most high-level environments like it, it's almost always better to encapsulate the values into a provider. Moving to environments which are "closer to the hardware" starts to bring in considerations of performance trade-off, but this is rarely a concern for PHP. –  ctrahey Aug 27 '12 at 6:20

If you insist on NOT using globals (which is indeed a bad habit!) then you can "hide" it inside a function:

function get_state($state_code){
  static $states = array(
                "AL" => "Alabama",
                     ...
                "WY" => "Wyoming"
                );
  return $states[$state_code];
} 

But, in this case, it seems to me that using a global array would be just fine, kind of like creating an Enam in Java.

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1  
Ah, but what if my array were like –  enkrypt0r Aug 27 '12 at 5:50
2  
At least declare the array static to avoid having it redeclared each time the function is called. –  deceze Aug 27 '12 at 5:50
    
@enkrypt0r I don't understand your comment. deceze - that's a good idea! I'll update my solution. –  alfasin Aug 27 '12 at 5:54
    
Sorry, I accidentally hit enter above. Here's what I meant to say: Ah, but what if I wanted to perform different operations on the same array? Perhaps I'd like one function to get the state code from the state name, and another function to get the state name from the state code. Surely I could do both of these things with the same array, so wouldn't it be a bad idea to have the same array in to different places? –  enkrypt0r Aug 27 '12 at 5:57
    
@enkrypt0r on this specific example you probably wouldn't want to modify the array, not even via. setter. But in general, if you want to be able to do more than just fetching a value for an array, then deceze's answer here will best fit your needs! –  alfasin Aug 27 '12 at 5:59

Sounds like a wrapping class would be in order that bundles those functions that are apparently related together:

class CountryHelper {

    protected static $states = array('AL' => ..., ...);

    public function foo() {
        self::$states ...
    }

    public function bar() {
        self::$states ...
    }

}
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Hmmmm... This seems like a good solution for most problems, but what if I had a small, procedural, single file? Like a cron job or something? Would you still recommend a separate class? –  enkrypt0r Aug 27 '12 at 6:00
    
If it's the sanest structure for your code, it doesn't matter how big or small the using script is. –  deceze Aug 27 '12 at 6:08

It depends on the environment you are working in - in MVC, I would inject this as a static property of the Controller so you can access it via:

 $this -> settings('states')[$state];

Otherwise, I'd just stick with static fields of a Settings class:

 class Settings
 {

      static $states = array( ... );

 }

Or even with a singleton filled up at script startup, that could load settings from elsewhere if needed [yaml / ini] - though singleton using is not a good practice in my opinion.

Anyway don't go global, always namespace your vars / functions properly.

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1  
Note that "MVC", in this sense, would characterize the array in question as a "model", and it should not be a property on the controller, but a separate and distinct model which the controller could choose to load as necessary and pass to whomever it decides needs it. This is actually a decent case-study in the value of MVC; 'cuase doing it wrong means the data is hanging around wether it is used or not, when it should logically be loaded and discarded as needed. –  ctrahey Aug 27 '12 at 6:28

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