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I've been attempting a little SFINAE at making a way to determine if a generic type T has a copy constructor I can use. Here is where I currently am.

template <bool statement, typename out>
struct Failable
{
    typedef out Type;
};
//This class is only used to insert statements that 
//could encounter substitution failure


template <typename O>
struct COPY
{
    template <typename T>
    typename Failable<true == sizeof(&T::T(const T&)), char>::Type copy(int)
    {}

    template <typename T>
    typename Failable<true, int>::Type copy(...)
    {}

};

However, this is also where I'm kinda stuck. &T::T(const T&) is obviously an invalid statement, as we can't provide an argument list with a pointer-to-member, even if a p-t-m-function. I could always try to specify some sort of void (T::*ptmf)(const T&) = &T::T, and hope it implicitly determines the right overloaded constructor to put into the pointer to member function, but that also implies that Constructors have a specific return type, which I would have to specify.

Does anyone else have any ideas with which I can trek forth? (I also need to apply a similar concept to checking for an assignment operator.)

Thanks in advanced.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use std::is_copy_constructible and std::is_assignable for this.

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...why is it that a potentially difficult question just has to have easy answers? sigh Thanks for letting me know about this! I'm hoping to see if there's a way to implement it manually, though =) –  Serge Aug 27 '12 at 6:14
1  
@Serge: you might look at the stackoverflow.com/questions/2733377/… - change the test to something like sizeof U(*(U*)0)) (note U(U()) also requires default constructibility so isn't good). –  Tony D Aug 27 '12 at 6:48

You can do with your code, just need to modify it a little bit.

template <bool statement, typename out>
struct Failable
{
     typedef out Type;
}; 

template <typename O>
struct COPY
{

     static O MakeO();

     template <typename U> // U and T are the same type
     static typename Failable<(sizeof U(MakeO())), char>::Type copy(int);

     template <typename U>
     static typename Failable<true, int>::Type copy(...);

     enum { value = sizeof(char) == sizeof( copy<O>(0) ) };
};
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I tried to use this solution as I need to use an old g++. If the copy ctor is private an error message is presented `error: 'CA::CA(const CA&)' is private. Could it be avoided? Otherwise how could it be that there is no copy ctor? –  TrueY Mar 27 at 14:22
    
Actually it does work with g++ 4.7+. At first I tried with 4.1.2 and it failed. THX! –  TrueY Mar 31 at 9:51

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