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I'm trying to have python delete some directories and I get access errors on them. I think its that the python user account doesn't have rights?

WindowsError: [Error 5] Access is denied: 'path'

is what I get when I run the script.
I've tried

shutil.rmtree  
os.remove  
os.rmdir

they all return the same error.

share|improve this question
    
Well, with which user account do you run the script? Usually you should know, at least on your machines and if you set up the script to run ... – Joey Jul 31 '09 at 17:03
    
I'm just running it as myself, and I can delete the directly manually, so I'm thinking its a weird windows and python permissions disconnect – DevelopingChris Jul 31 '09 at 17:04
    
Try running the script with SysInternals' "Process Monitor" to see exactly which object (file, directory or whatever) the error occurs on and what process it occurs in. "Process Explorer" can tell you what crededtials the process is running under (maybe Process Monitor can too; I'm not sure). – Michael Burr Jul 31 '09 at 17:21
    
Would you mind printing out the path you're trying to delete and posting the output here? It could be a problem with the format the path is specified in. – Andre Miller Jul 31 '09 at 19:39
    
possible duplicate of Deleting directory in Python – mozzbozz Jan 21 '15 at 17:29
up vote 39 down vote accepted

We've had issues removing files and directories on Windows, even if we had just copied them, if they were set to 'readonly'. shutil.rmtree() offers you sort of exception handlers to handle this situation. You call it and provide an exception handler like this:

import errno, os, stat, shutil

def handleRemoveReadonly(func, path, exc):
  excvalue = exc[1]
  if func in (os.rmdir, os.remove) and excvalue.errno == errno.EACCES:
      os.chmod(path, stat.S_IRWXU| stat.S_IRWXG| stat.S_IRWXO) # 0777
      func(path)
  else:
      raise

shutil.rmtree(filename, ignore_errors=False, onerror=handleRemoveReadonly)

You might want to try that.

share|improve this answer
2  
Also see the onerror function in voidspace.org.uk/downloads/pathutils.py – Sridhar Ratnakumar Apr 16 '10 at 22:31
    
I'm getting: NameError: name 'stat' is not defined EDIT: Requires that you do 'import stat' at the top of your script. Did solve my problem though. Many thanks! – advocate Apr 4 '12 at 19:19
2  
I tried this solution, now I have the [Error 5] Access denied error with this line : os.chmod(path, stat.S_IRWXU| stat.S_IRWXG| stat.S_IRWXO) # 0777 – Johanna May 10 '12 at 15:22
    
@Johanna This recipe only works for files for which you have chmod permission (e.g. files you own). – ThomasH May 11 '12 at 20:11
    
It's also necessary to import errno – Ixx May 12 '12 at 13:41

I've never used Python, but I would assume it runs as whatever user executes the script.

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ok, so it apparently runs as me, why can't I delete the file through python, but I can if I just delete it through rmdir on the command line? – DevelopingChris Jul 31 '09 at 17:14
    
Do you just have the path hard coded? Are you sure it's the correct path? I can't think of any reason why it wouldn't work if you can do it manually. – Max Schmeling Jul 31 '09 at 17:16
    
yeah, I had it dynamically getting the path from a listdir, but then when that got hosed up, I just put the same path in python, setup the scenario and python can't delete it but I can if I use cmd – DevelopingChris Jul 31 '09 at 17:27
    
I really don't know what could be the issue then. I'm guessing the Access denied error is just disguising the real issue, unless Python runs methods like that in some kind of sandbox. Sorry I don't have better answers. – Max Schmeling Jul 31 '09 at 17:59

The scripts have no special user, they just run under the currently logged-in user which executed the script.

Have you tried checking that:

  • you are trying to delete a valid path? and that
  • the path has no locked files?
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If the script is being run as a scheduled task (which seems likely for a cleanup script), it will probably run as SYSTEM. It's (unwise, but) possible to set permissions on directories so that SYSTEM has no access.

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Scheduled tasks run as whatever user you tell it to run as. Though, I think on older versions of windows this isn't true. – Max Schmeling Jul 31 '09 at 17:10

Are the directories empty, and if not do those methods support decursively deleting the contents of a directory?

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How are you running the script? From an interactive console session? If so, just open up a DOS command window (using cmd) and type 'whoami'. That is who you are running the scripts interactively.

Ok I saw your edits just now...why don't you print the path and check the properties to see if the user account running the scripts has the required privileges?

If whoami does not work on your version of Windows, you may use the environment variables like SET USERNAME and SET DOMAINNAME from your command window.

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1  
whoami is a *nix command, not windows. – Max Schmeling Jul 31 '09 at 17:06
2  
@Max--have you tried it on Windows? It works just fine. – Kevin Jul 31 '09 at 17:07
    
I just tried it, it doesn't work for me – Max Schmeling Jul 31 '09 at 17:07
    
whoami not found on my XP at work. – Mark Rushakoff Jul 31 '09 at 17:09
    
I'm guessing something you've installed added a whoami command. – Max Schmeling Jul 31 '09 at 17:09

@ThomasH : another brick to the wall.

On unix systems, you have to ensure that parent directory is writeable too. Here is another version :

def remove_readonly(func, path, exc):
    excvalue = exc[1]
    if func in (os.rmdir, os.remove) and excvalue.errno == errno.EACCES:

        # ensure parent directory is writeable too
        pardir = os.path.abspath(os.path.join(path, os.path.pardir))
        if not os.access(pardir, os.W_OK):
            os.chmod(pardir, stat.S_IRWXU| stat.S_IRWXG| stat.S_IRWXO)

        os.chmod(path, stat.S_IRWXU| stat.S_IRWXG| stat.S_IRWXO) # 0777
        func(path)
    else:
        raise
share|improve this answer
    
According to the Python Documention, Exceptions raised by onerror will not be caught so I'm not sure the raise statement means anything. – kmarsh Nov 3 '15 at 16:31

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