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A while back I provided an answer to this question.

Objective: count the number of values in this matrix that are in the [3 6] range:

A = [2 3 4 5 6 7;
     7 6 5 4 3 2]

I came up with 12 different ways to do it:

count = numel(A( A(:)>3 & A(:)<6 ))      %# (1)
count = length(A( A(:)>3 & A(:)<6 ))     %# (2)
count = nnz( A(:)>3 & A(:)<6 )           %# (3)
count = sum( A(:)>3 & A(:)<6 )           %# (4)

Ac = A(:);
count = numel(A( Ac>3 & Ac<6 ))          %# (5,6,7,8)
%# prevents double expansion
%# similar for length(), nnz(), sum(),
%# in the same order as (1)-(4)

count = numel(A( abs(A-(6+3)/2)<3/2 ))   %# (9,10,11,12)
%# prevents double comparison and & 
%# similar for length(), nnz(), sum()
%# in the same order as (1)-(4)

So, I decided to find out which is fastest. Test code:

A = randi(10, 50);
tic
for ii = 1:1e5

    %# method is inserted here

end
toc

results (best of 5 runs, all in seconds):

%# ( 1): 2.981446
%# ( 2): 3.006602
%# ( 3): 3.077083
%# ( 4): 2.619057
%# ( 5): 3.011029
%# ( 6): 2.868021
%# ( 7): 3.149641
%# ( 8): 2.457988
%# ( 9): 1.675575
%# (10): 1.675384
%# (11): 2.442607
%# (12): 1.222510

So it seems that count = sum(( abs(A(:)-(6+3)/2) < (3/2) )); is the fastest way to go here...

I trade one < with two divisions, an addition and an abs, and the execution time is less than half! Does anyone have an explanation for why this is?

The JIT compiler probably replaces the divisions/additions with a single value in memory, but there's still the abs...Branch misprediction then? Seems silly for something as simple as this...

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The A(:)>3 & A(:)<6 expression needs to evaluate two conditions, whereas the abs(A(:)-(6+3)/2) < 3/2) evaluates one only one.

For very tight compute intensive loops this makes a lot of difference. Even without branch mispredictions, branching in itself is relatively costly. That's why, for instance, loop unrolling works as an optimization technique.

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three if statements? Doesn't this sort of thing get JITed to the equivalent of if (element[i] < 6) && (element[i] > 3){...}? Even if this is not the case, then it would be maximum two if-statements, no? if (element[i]<6) return true; return false; ...&&...if (element[i]>6) return true; return false; –  Rody Oldenhuis Aug 27 '12 at 8:19
    
Probably two indeed. –  IvoTops Aug 27 '12 at 12:40
    
By the way, && is short-circuit, but works on scalars only. I used & because that's the way to do it with arrays. Strange, but that's the way it is. I expect that internally they're the same, but the syntax is anyway different. Shall I edit your post? –  Rody Oldenhuis Aug 27 '12 at 12:51
    
Really I did not know branching was so costly...I'll remember that for the future. Thanks. –  Rody Oldenhuis Aug 29 '12 at 8:57
    
Sure, feel free to change it. I am not fluent in matlab and missed that ;-) –  IvoTops Aug 29 '12 at 12:17
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