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How can I test if a command returns a string or returns nothing in bash. For example, something like

if ls -al returns any then;
  echo "there are files"
else
 echo "no files found"
fi
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4  
won't ls -al always return something? (e.g. . and ..) –  Jon Lin Aug 27 '12 at 6:55
4  
A command does not return a string (it returns a small integer exit code, usually 0 for success and 1 or 2 on failure), but it may output some data, to put in a string. –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 27 '12 at 6:56
    
@BasileStarynkevitch this is the thing I need.I know command returns exit code.But my commands exit code is always 0.so I need to control the output –  barp Aug 27 '12 at 6:58
1  
You should read some Bash scripting tutorial tldp.org/LDP/abs/html –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 27 '12 at 7:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Like Basile says, commands don't return values; they output them. You can capture this output by using a subshell; e.g. $(ls -A). You can test for a non-empty string in Bash like so:

if [[ -n $(ls -A) ]]; then
    echo "there are files"
else
    echo "no files found"
fi

Note that I've used -A rather than -a, since it omits the symbolic current (.) and parent (..) directory entries.


If you want to check that the command completed successfully, you can inspect $?, which contains the exit code of the last command (zero for success, non-zero for failure). For example:

files=$(ls -A)
if [[ $? !=0 ]]; then
    echo "Command failed."
elif [[ -n $files ]]; then
    echo "Files found."
else
    echo "No files found."
fi

More info here.

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What if the output of the command is some error? –  banarun Jun 25 '13 at 16:56
    
@banarun Then you can use bash's $? to test the exit code of the last command. –  Will Vousden Jun 27 at 16:49
1  
if zero is for success, then wouldn't it be: if [[ $? != 0 ]]? –  mara Jun 28 at 19:04
    
@mara Yes, of course. Whoops! –  Will Vousden Jun 28 at 19:21

For those who want an elegant, bash version-independent solution (in fact should work in other modern shells) and those who love to use one-liners for quick tasks. Here we go!

ls | grep . && echo 'files found' || echo 'files not found'

(note as one of the comments mentioned, ls -al and in fact, just -l and -a will all return something, so in my answer I use simple ls

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Bash Reference Manual

6.4 Bash Conditional Expressions

-z string
     True if the length of string is zero.

-n string
string
     True if the length of string is non-zero.

You can use shorthand version:

if [[ $(ls -A) ]]; then
  echo "there are files"
else
  echo "no files found"
fi
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I'm guessing you want the output of the ls -al command, so in bash, you'd have something like:

LS=`ls -la`

if [ -n "$LS" ]; then
  echo "there are files"
else
  echo "no files found"
fi
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if [ -z "$(ls -lA)" ]; then
  echo "no files found"
else
  echo "There are files"
fi

This will run the command and echt whether the returned output (string) has a zero length. You might want to check the 'test' manual pages for other flags.

Use the "" around the argument that is being checked, otherwise empty results will result in a syntax error as there is not second argument (to check) given!

Note: that ls -la always returns . and .. so using that will not work, see ls manual pages. Furthermore, while this might seem convenient and easy, I suppose it will break easily. Writing a small script/application that returns 0 or 1 depending on the result is much more reliable!

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You might prefer to use $( instead of backquote, because $( nest better –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 27 '12 at 7:02
    
You are right it is better practice to use them always, although we do not need nesting here. –  Veger Aug 27 '12 at 7:09

As Jon Lin commented, ls -al will always output (for . and ..). You want ls -Al to avoid these two directories.

You could for example put the output of the command into a shell variable:

v=$(ls -Al)

An older, non-nestable, notation is

v=`ls -Al`

but I prefer the nestable notation $( ... )

The you can test if that variable is non empty

if [ -n "$v" ]; then
    echo there are files
else
    echo no files
fi

And you could combine both as if [ -n "$(ls -Al)" ]; then

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