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What is the best method to sort a sparse array and keep the elements on the same indexes? For example:

a[0] = 3, 
a[1] = 2, 
a[2] = 6,
a[7] = 4,
a[8] = 5,

I would like after the sort to have

a[0] = 2, 
a[1] = 3, 
a[2] = 4, 
a[7] = 5, 
a[8] = 6.
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Maybe you could try to google with the key words : 'sort', 'associative array', 'by value' if I understand well your issue. –  Ricola3D Aug 27 '12 at 7:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 127 down vote accepted

Here's one approach. It copies the defined array elements to a new array and saves their indexes. It sorts the new array and then puts the sorted results back into the indexes that were previously used.

var a = [];
a[0] = 3;
a[1] = 2; 
a[2] = 6; 
a[7] = 4; 
a[8] = 5;


function sortSparseArray(arr) {
    var tempArr = [], indexes = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        // find all array elements that are not undefined
        if (arr[i] !== undefined) {
            tempArr.push(arr[i]);    // save value
            indexes.push(i);         // save index
        }
    }
    // sort values (numeric sort)
    // if you want a different type of sort, insert your own sort function
    tempArr.sort(function(a,b) {
        return(a - b);
    });
    // put sorted values back into the indexes in the original array that were used
    for (var i = 0; i < indexes.length; i++) {
        arr[indexes[i]] = tempArr[i];
    }
    return(arr);
}

Working demo: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/3ank4/

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288  
works with stacksort! ;) –  s1lence Mar 18 '13 at 19:05
11  
@s1lence: yes, I just landed here from gkoberger.github.com/stacksort? –  Remus Rusanu Mar 18 '13 at 19:06
3  
@OrhanC1 - I fixed it. The code was doing a lexicographic sort (so it would have worked for string entries). Now, it is set for a numeric sort. –  jfriend00 Mar 19 '13 at 1:47
2  
If you are wondering what stacksort is: gkoberger.github.com/stacksort –  Michael Kernahan Mar 19 '13 at 14:31
5  
Next up: @jfriend00 goes rogue and changes the code to be entirely malicious. Hundreds of xkcd readers are affected. –  nzifnab Mar 20 '13 at 0:11
var arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10];
// functions sort
function sIncrease(i, ii) { // ascending
 if (i > ii)
 return 1;
 else if (i < ii)
 return -1;
 else
 return 0;
}
function sDecrease(i, ii) { //descending
 if (i > ii)
 return -1;
 else if (i < ii)
 return 1;
 else
 return 0;
}
function sRand() { // random
 return Math.random() > 0.5 ? 1 : -1;
}
arr.sort(sIncrease); // return [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
arr.sort(sDecrease); // return [10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1]
arr.sort(sRand); // return random array for examle [1,10,3,4,8,6,9,2,7,5]
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2  
I don't think this is what the question was really asking. –  jfriend00 Aug 27 '12 at 7:27
var i, l, tmp = [], map = [], a = [];
a[0] = 3;
a[1] = 2;
a[2] = 6;
a[7] = 4;
a[8] = 5;

alert(a);

for (i=0, l=a.length; i<l; i++) {
    if (typeof a[i] !== 'undefined') {
        map.push(i);
    }
}

a.sort();


for (i=0, l=map.length; i<l; i++) {
    tmp[map[i]] = a[i];
}

a = tmp;

alert(a);

Note: JS does not really support sparse arrays. It fills in undefined values.

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