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what should i do to wait until all the data sent to serial port

to test this condition assume the code bellow:

            Console.WriteLine("Baud is:" + SerialPortObj.BaudRate);
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.Millisecond);
            string tmpStr="";
            for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            {
                tmpStr += "A";
            }
            SerialPortObj.Write(tmpStr.ToCharArray(),0,99);
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.Millisecond);

example output is:

Baud is:300

97

97

And it indicate that .Net is not waiting until all chars to be send!

just to mention the code below does not work:

            Console.WriteLine("Baud is:" + SerialPortObj.BaudRate);
            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.Millisecond);
            string tmpStr="";
            for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
            {
                tmpStr += "A";
            }
            SerialPortObj.Write(tmpStr.ToCharArray(),0,99);

            while (SerialPortObj.BytesToWrite>0)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(1);
                Console.WriteLine(SerialPortObj.BytesToWrite);
            };

            Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.Millisecond);

example output is:

Baud is:300

97

97


i am working on an special protocol that is depends on baud rate change over and use some thing like the follow:

       ->[Send Some Bytes (Baud300)] 

       <-[Receive Another Bytes (Baud9600)]

so i want to send some chars by write method and wait until it finish and right after finishing i try to change baud , so i could understand the received bytes


is there any idea?

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May be it sends data really quick? Try to increase loop to 10000 iterations and see whats happens next –  Reniuz Aug 27 '12 at 7:51
1  
as the baud is 300 therefor each character last about 23 milliseconds. –  mefmef Aug 27 '12 at 7:56
    
With one start and one stop bit, I would expect 33ms per char or 3.3s for the DRIVER to send all 100 chars. The serial port write () call will not wait, in general, for all the chars. to actually be sent out on the line. What is actually tx? You seem to have forgotten to tell us that vital item of debug info. –  Martin James Aug 27 '12 at 9:14
    
sorry i did not catch your question. if you mean port setting : 7 N 1 - it is rs232 serial commiunication –  mefmef Aug 27 '12 at 9:19
    
OK, lets try another way - why do you need to wait for all the data to be actually sent out on the wire? Most developers don't want to wait. Also, I'm far from convinced that, even if the tx buffer contents is reported as 0, that actually means that all chars have been completely tx - the actual meaning depends on the driver, hardware FIFO interrupts, nasty things like that. It may just mean that the last [up to 16] chars have been loaded into the UART FIFO. –  Martin James Aug 27 '12 at 9:28

3 Answers 3

In the first place the serial port is stateless. So you can never really by sure when the right point in time is reached for a baud rate change. Due to the fact that you are going to implement your own special protocol you must have control of both sides of the communication (sender/receiver). So in that case i strongly recommend to also set the Handshake property to RequestToSend and checking of the DtrEnable property.

Also you should use two buffers (received/outgoing) on each site of the communication which are watched by their own task/thread. If you push something into the outgoing buffer, the task check if sending is possible (CtsHolding, DsrHolding) and if yes, change the baudrate and push that data onto the wire. Wait till the holding properties are set back and then change the baudrate to the other value. The incoming thread is quite simple in this case. It simply waits for the DataReceived event cause the change of the baudrate is done by the outgoing task.

If you use hardware handshake (which i strongly recommend in your case), then be sure that your serial port supports it correctly. Most of the USB-to-Serial-Adapters don't work very well with anything else then 19200-8-N-1. So before you think you didn't code it right or the SerialPort class is buggy try to find two machines with a real serial port (or one machine with two ports for testing).

share|improve this answer
    
That might work.. I'e never seen a serial link with different baud rates for each direction :( –  Martin James Aug 27 '12 at 12:22
    
@MartinJames: Yes, i also never seen this before (nor i would make it), but if the OP likes to get into this hassle. ;-) –  Oliver Aug 27 '12 at 12:37

Try to store your data in a variable and when a specific condition apear (can be set by you), send the value of the variable to the serial port

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i think you did not understand my case. my problem is the condition OR in another way HOW Could i understand all bytes were send? –  mefmef Aug 27 '12 at 7:59

Do it in hardware?

You might try to use two serial adaptors, configured as 300/9600. Tx on one and rx on the other. You would need a 'funny cable' with pins 2/3 split out to different D-types, but that should work.

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