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Given this method in a Java class:

public void execute(String command) {

    ProcessBuilder processBuilder = new ProcessBuilder(command);
    Process process = processBuilder.start();

    int exitValue = process.waitFor();
    if (exitValue != 0) {
        throw new RuntimeException("a message here...");
    }
}

I'm trying to come up with a proper cross platform unit test for this method.

I'm looking for a common command across all operating systems (Win, Linux, Mac and ...) or a fake command that I can pass to this method in my unit tests.

Any suggestion ?

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1  
I think if you can run junit on all platform, then you can run a command of java with simple main class –  andy Aug 27 '12 at 7:51
    
Your method has return type void; it might help if it returned the exitValue. –  S.L. Barth Aug 27 '12 at 7:54
5  
@S.L.Barth The method throws an exception if a non-success exit-value is returned by the process, so returning the exitValue would be pointless, as 0 would be returned always. –  Alderath Aug 27 '12 at 7:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This method can't be tested via a unit test but only via an integration test. To make a unit test you could do a small refactor. Introduce a new interface ProcessBuilderFactory (and a default implementation) and inject it on your class.

public interface ProcessBuilderFactory {
    ProcessBuilder createProcessBuilder(String command);
}

public class DefaultProcessBuilderFactory implements ProcessBuilderFactory {
    public ProcessBuilder createProcessBuilder(String command) {
        return new ProcessBuilder(command);
    }
}

public class ProcessExecutor {
    private ProcessBuilderFactory processBuilderFactory;
    private ProcessExecutor(ProcessBuilderFactory processBuilderFactory) {
        this.processBuilderFactory = processBuilderFactory;
    }

    public void execute(String command) {
        ProcessBuilder processBuilder = processBuilderFactory.createProcessBuilder(command);
        Process process = processBuilder.start();

        int exitValue = process.waitFor();
        if (exitValue != 0) {
            throw new RuntimeException("a message here...");
        }
    }
}

and then you could make a unit test by injecting a mock ProcessBuilderFactory. You start writing the test, you create a mock ProcessBuilderFactory, returning a mock ProcessBuilder... damned, ProcessBuilder is final too :(

A strong reminder : write the test first !

So we have two options :

  1. introduce a new interface for wrapping the ProcessBuilder with a default implementation... in the same way we create the ProcessBuilderFactory
  2. undo the refactoring and look at PowerMock, for final class mocking
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1  
Indeed, the test would simple test whether de proces is invoked and handled properly. A different unittest should then test the correctness of the created processes by processBuilder. –  dstibbe Aug 27 '12 at 8:17
    
I believe you won't be able to unit test the ProcessBuilderFactory, for the same reason that you cannot unit test the original method. –  Dušan Rychnovský Aug 27 '12 at 10:22
    
@DušanRychnovský you are right, i complete my response. –  gontard Aug 27 '12 at 10:36
    
btw, ProcessBuilder itself is a FINAL class and I can't extend it. so I need to introduce another interface like MyProcessBuilder with a default implementation which is a wrapper around java ProcessBuilder. Sounds too much work for a unit test :) –  mhshams Aug 28 '12 at 2:31
    
@mohammadshamsi you are right, i complete my answer –  gontard Aug 28 '12 at 7:38

Since this is java unit test you could use java.exe as standard exe. Say java.exe -version. It will always be there :). Use current jdk from java.home and then use that to refer java.exe

Looking at specific requirement could you use any mocking framework? (jmockit for example)

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2  
Well, with the .exe there, it's not really cross-platform, is it :)? Also, this assumes that Java is on the path, which isn't always the case. –  jqno Aug 27 '12 at 8:24
    
from your question, I thought, you need a command that gives some output in all test environment. I thought you have java on all test environment. You can always find java.exe and use absolute path. –  Jayan Aug 27 '12 at 8:28
2  
What I mean is, on Linux and OS X, the file won't be called java.exe; that's only true on Windows. The OP explicitly asked for something that's cross-platform. –  jqno Aug 27 '12 at 8:35
    
Oh.. I forgot that no exe part on unix versions. –  Jayan Aug 27 '12 at 9:37

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