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Here is a code used to display error messages

ActionView::Base.field_error_proc = Proc.new do |html_tag, instance_tag|
  unless html_tag =~ /^<label/
    "<span class=\"field_with_errors\">#{html_tag}</span>".html_safe
  else
    "#{html_tag}".html_safe
  end
end

However, it's better to not use unless and else together. So I did

ActionView::Base.field_error_proc = Proc.new do |html_tag, instance_tag|
  if html_tag !=~ /^<label/
    "#{html_tag}".html_safe
  else
    "<span class=\"field_with_errors\">#{html_tag}</span>".html_safe 
  end
end

and it's not working.

I know this is because of "!=~". Well, how do I change it to make it work?

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1  
what wrong with unless though I dont understand why people dont use unless as effective as if well you can use not though preceded by if something like not(html_tag =~ /^<label/) hope this help –  Viren Aug 27 '12 at 8:11
    
The operator is !~, but then you wouldn't want to switch the operations done in the block. –  Joshua Cheek Aug 27 '12 at 8:55
    
Semi duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/7693486/479863 –  mu is too short Aug 27 '12 at 9:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should just use =~. The following gives the same result as your original code with unless:

ActionView::Base.field_error_proc = Proc.new do |html_tag, instance_tag|
  if html_tag =~ /^<label/
    "#{html_tag}".html_safe
  else
    "<span class=\"field_with_errors\">#{html_tag}</span>".html_safe 
  end
end
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Then I don't understand why is it working? Why unless html_tag =~ /^<label/ is equal to if html_tag =~ /^<label/? –  Alexandre Aug 27 '12 at 8:17
1  
No. It's the opposite, but your else clause in the original is now in the if and vice versa. That's why it works. –  Mischa Aug 27 '12 at 8:19
1  
aaaaaaaaaa, now I got it. –  Alexandre Aug 27 '12 at 11:21

!=~ isn't a Ruby operator, so it actually tokenizes as != ~, which is an entirely different operation. Thus, html_tag !=~ /^<label/ actually tests html_tag != ~/^<label/, which is equal to html_tag != nil, which will always be true.

You can see this here:

>> "x" !=~ nil
NoMethodError: undefined method `~' for nil:NilClass
    from (irb):104
    from :0

You should just use plain =~.

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The alternative solution to the above is to use the !~ operator, which is the inverse of =~.

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