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Say i have a dictionary within a dictionary like so:

Allusers={
User1: {'Film1': Vote1, 'Film2': Vote2}
User2: {'Film1': Vote1, 'Film2'; Vote2}
...

}

I would need the logic/algorithm/formula to compare every person to the other persons, just once. How would I need to approach this ? Thank you.

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closed as not a real question by Martijn Pieters, esaelPsnoroMoN, Andrew, Peter Ritchie, Bryan Crosby Aug 27 '12 at 21:36

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Define 'compare'. What are you looking for? –  Martijn Pieters Aug 27 '12 at 8:12
    
@MartijnPieters: I think for the question the comparison is irrelevant. –  Constantinius Aug 27 '12 at 8:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
from itertools import combinations

Allusers={
    'User1': {'Film1': 'Vote1', 'Film2': 'Vote2'},
    'User2': {'Film1': 'Vote1', 'Film2': 'Vote2'}
}

for comb in combinations(Allusers, 2):
    if Allusers[comb[0]] == Allusers[comb[1]]:
        print '{0} is same with {1}'.format(comb[0], comb[1])
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@Martijn Pieters: You're right, Code changed. –  MostafaR Aug 27 '12 at 8:22

something like :

users={
User1: {'Film1': Vote1, 'Film2': Vote2}
User2: {'Film1': Vote1, 'Film2'; Vote2}
User3: {'Film1': Vote1, 'Film2'; Vote2}
User4: {'Film1': Vote1, 'Film2'; Vote2}
}
keys=list(users)
for i,x in enumerate(keys):
    for y in keys[i+1:]:
        #compare users[x] and users[y] here

here in the first loop User1 will be compared to users 2,3,4 and in the next loop User2 will be comapared to users 3,4 only as he's already comapared to User1 in the first loop.

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Thanks, I think that is what I was looking for. –  user413734 Aug 27 '12 at 8:26
    
@user413734: The combinations solutions are far more readable and memory efficient than this one. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 27 '12 at 8:26

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