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I need to update a record with date and time, but I am confused to use either CURRENT_TIMESTAMP of sql server 2005 or date object of JAVA, both gives me the same result.

example:

select CURRENT_TIMESTAMP

this will print 2012-08-27 14:30:17.193

and this java code below will also do the same visibly but what is the difference.

           Date dNow = new Date( );
           SimpleDateFormat ft = 
           new SimpleDateFormat ("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss.SSS ");

           System.out.println("Current Date: " + ft.format(dNow));

UPDATE:

I have 2 prepareStatement below for while I have used CURRENT_TIMESTAMP and for the 2nd one I have used date object of JAVA (the date object let it be either util.Date or sql.Date).

statement1

  pst = con.prepareStatement("insert into sLog(logUser, logType, logSystem, logTime)
             values(?, ?, ?, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP)");
                    pst.setString(1, logUser);
                    pst.setString(2, logType);
                    pst.setString(3, logSystem);
                    pst.executeUpdate();

statement2

pst = con.prepareStatement("insert into sLog(logUser, logType, logSystem, logTime)
             values(?, ?, ?, ?)");
                pst.setString(1, logUser);
                pst.setString(2, logType);
                pst.setString(3, logSystem);
                pst.setString(4, format(dNow));
                pst.executeUpdate();
share|improve this question
    
The command on the SQL Sever will give you the date in the timezone in which the server is. But if you use the one in java you can specify the timezone (or set it specically to GMT). – Naidu Ypvs Aug 27 '12 at 9:30
    
@NaiduYpvs If so I have scenario for both java and sql where, while I update and if end user changes his time. Will it update the end user time or what? – Sathish Kumar k k Aug 27 '12 at 9:41
    
Honestly you should be using a GregorianCalendar as you can set timezone format for it. And since the Java code runs on the server it will take default timeformat of the server. – Naidu Ypvs Aug 27 '12 at 9:49
    
@NaiduYpvs I think I got the point I needed, say for example. If the java code is written for stand alone application. Then it will take only the end user's system time and If I use sql server's date query inside my java code like as I did in statement1 then it will insert the record with server time which will be a common time used for all end users. Right? – Sathish Kumar k k Aug 27 '12 at 9:56
1  
yes. But I would still suggest you use GregorianCalendar and not the date. – Naidu Ypvs Aug 27 '12 at 10:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The first method uses SQL function directly. It has database dependency. The second method passed java method and cannot use SQL function directly.It hasn't database dependency.If you want to use portable code, uses second method.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with you. But my requirement is that, the Date and Time I insert should not come from end user computer, since he/she will change the time for his own personal requirement, so I'm going to use SQL function directly. Hey do you have any other alternative for me. – Sathish Kumar k k Aug 27 '12 at 11:21
    
@SathishKumarkk If your user do not want to change database, first option is good. – Sai Ye Yan Naing Aye Aug 27 '12 at 11:27
    
what you mean by user do not want to change database. I could not get you point properly. – Sathish Kumar k k Aug 27 '12 at 11:28
    
@SathishKumarkk i mean SQL server to Postgres server or other database servers – Sai Ye Yan Naing Aye Aug 27 '12 at 11:30
    
I understood and that will not happen. No database change will take place. But I got a question from your reply that is, if I need to change the database then is there any way so that I can use common date and time for all user? – Sathish Kumar k k Aug 27 '12 at 11:41

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