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To avoid repetitive definitions, I am trying to move internal function prototypes from the class One into a C# using My.Class.One directive (like import My.Class.One in Java).

In Java, this would change this code:

public class One {
   public static void func1();
   public static void func2();
   public static int main(String[] args) { ... }
}

...into that code split into different files:

import My.Include;

public class One {
   public static int Main(String[] args) { ... }
}
------------------------->8--------------------------------    
package Include;

public class My {
   public static void func1();
   public static void func2();
   ...
}

After learning that Java 'packages' are named 'namespaces' in C# I came up with the following C# code which fails to compile (mcs One.cs My_include.cs -out:One.exe) with the error:

> "error CS0103: The name `func1' does not exist in the current context"

using System;
using My.Include;

public class One {
   public static int Main(String[] args) { return funct1(); }
}
------------------------->8--------------------------------    
using System;

namespace My {
   namespace Include {
      public class functions {
      public static void func1();
      public static void func2();
      ...
      }
   }
}

I tried many different naming conventions but I still get the same error. Can you tell me what I do wrong?

share|improve this question
2  
It's really not clear what you're doing here, or what the Java code would look like. –  Jon Skeet Aug 27 '12 at 9:50
    
As written in the question above, the Java code would substitute the C# "using" by using the Java "import" to avoid repetitive declarations. –  Eli Aug 28 '12 at 13:44
    
But that doesn't make sense, as you're declaring the class One and trying to import it at the same time in the second snippet. Again, that would make no sense in Java. If you could show a full Java example, it would really help. –  Jon Skeet Aug 28 '12 at 14:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like you want a partial class, so your main class file would look like:

// File:  One.cs
using System;

public class One
{
    static void Main()
    {
        // Your Main method here
    }
}

And you would have a second file which looks like:

// File:  One.Externs.cs
using System;

public partial class One
{
    extern static void func1();
    extern static void func2();
}

At compile-time, these two (or more) files are automatically combined to a single class by the compiler. This gives you the separation you appear to be looking for, but keeps the relevant definitions within the correct scopes.

The using directive is only partially synonymous to java's import directive - in C# using only provides a shortcut into a namespace whereas you're used to referring to a class or partial class with import.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Mike, your suggestion is even cleaner than the model I used with Java! –  Eli Aug 28 '12 at 13:50
    
Mike, What if I need to include this "partial Class" for other C# Classes? –  Eli Aug 28 '12 at 14:05
    
The partial keyword is used to split a single class into multiple sources. If you need the same extern definitions in multiple places within your code, you might be better to define a public static class which contains all of your externs, and reference that class wherever you need to make the call to the unmanaged code. –  Mike Insch Aug 28 '12 at 14:31
    
Thanks Mike. Would this public static class need to be referenced in the source code like with the Java "import My.Include; " directive? (see updated question above) Or would the mcs compiler just find what it needs if all classes are given on the same command-line? –  Eli Aug 28 '12 at 14:41
    
If the classes are all provided on the same command line, the compiler will build them. If the class is in a different namespace then for convenience you might wish to add a using directive at the head of other files. The thing to remember is that using just tells the compiler which namespaces to look in for object definitions, which is subtly different from the import directive in java. –  Mike Insch Aug 28 '12 at 16:27

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