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It may sound very irritating to some of you guys, but i am not convinced by the answer I got it by Googling. Say

class Animal
{
  public Animal()
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Animal constructor");
   }
}

class Dog : Animal
{
public Dog()
   {
      Console.WriteLine("Dog constructor");
   }

   }

Now the question is here if I write a code like this

Animal A = new Animal();

a Object is created in the heap and our referrence variable "A" point to that location in the heap.

Now If I write a code like this

Animal B = new Dog();

Then here how does the Referrence B point to the Object Dog?

I know it may sound very easy for many of you, but I am stuck with visual illustration of this concept. many a time I read that "We have an object of type Animal, but it references an object of type Dog". But what does it really mean?

Any elaborate answer would be good. As i am learning few of the .net (OOPS) concpet deeply.

Thanks

Animal and Dog Object

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2  
both your Dog and Animal classes are missing a constructor and will not compile. –  gideon Aug 27 '12 at 9:47
    
Now it is fine, Sorry for the mistakes. –  Debhere Aug 27 '12 at 9:51
    
Please take a look at my answer, then I think it is clear. –  Matt Aug 27 '12 at 11:01
    
I've added more details about the internals of objects to my answer, I hope it helps you. –  Matt Aug 28 '12 at 7:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you take a look at the classes (not their instances), then I would rather draw the picture like this:

enter image description here

Which means the Dog class has usually more methods and properties than the Animal class (for instance, a dog can bark (method) and has four legs (property)). And of course, additional memory has to be reserved when this class is instantiated. Imagine that the base classes methods and properties are created first, then the derived methods and properties are created in memory:

class Dog : Animal 
{ 
    public Dog() 
    { 
        legs = 4;
        Console.WriteLine("Dog constructor"); 
    } 


    public int legs { get; private set; }

    public void bark()
    {
         Console.WriteLine("grrrwoof!"); 
    }
} 

If you instantiate a Dog and assign it to an Animal reference variable as you did, then this reference can only access the methods an Animal has. Despite of this fact, the entire Dog object is still kept in memory:

Dog d = new Dog();
Animal a = (Animal)d;

In other words, d is able to do the following:

Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Number of legs: {0}", d.legs.ToString())); 
d.bark();

but a can't do that, because those "features" are not defined within the Animal class.

What is now important to know is that not all kinds of casts are allowed. It is always allowed to cast from a Dog to an Animal, because this is safe, but you can't cast an Animal to a Dog implicitly, so the follwing code throws an invalid cast exception:

Dog dogRef2 = a; // not allowed

If you know what you're doing (i.e. if you know for sure that a contains an instance of Dog), then you are allowed to cast explicitly as follows:

Dog dogRef2 = (Dog)a; // allowed

and you can access the properties and methods afterwards:

dogRef2.bark(); // works

This works, because the compiler and the runtime always store the methods and properties in the same structured way in memory and also create an internal descriptor to find it when it is referenced.

Note that this isn't always safe, for instance if you try the following:

Animal a = new Animal();
Dog dogRef2 = (Dog)a; // Invalid cast exception

Why? Because new Animal() hasn't created the method bark and the property legs, it has just created an instance of Animal (contains neither the property legs nor the method bark).

More info: If you want to find out more about the internal structure (how objects are created and stored), check out this link. Here is an example for a memory layout, taken from there: EEClasses

You can see that linked lists are used to build up the chain from the base classes instance objects to the derived classes instance objects.

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Excellent illustration and answer, this is all about base class and casting etc. this is fine but my question is How come the A referrence point to the Dog object? Let me give you some more When we write ` Animal A = new Animal();` A ref point to the new object Animal which is just created. But ` Animal A = new Dog();` then how ref variable A point to Dog as well as Animal object. As we know that depends upon our coding it invoke base class methods or parent class methods. So that is exactly my question –  Debhere Aug 27 '12 at 11:32
1  
It is the way the compiler and runtime system instantiates the object: Imagine the base class (Animal) is always instantiated first and stored in memory, then the derived classes methods and properties are stored. And there needs to be a kind of internal descriptor in memory too, which is used to find all the methods and properties of the base class and the derived class. Now, because the base class comes first, the Animal reference variable finds the (base) methods and properties it expects and so does the Dog reference variable (because of the internal descriptor structure). –  Matt Aug 27 '12 at 15:28
    
Thanks Matt, It is indeed a nice explanation. –  Debhere Aug 30 '12 at 8:48

how does the Referrence B point to the Object Dog?

Same way reference A points to object Animal. I think you are maybe confusing how classes are related via inheritance vs instantiated.

Creating a new instance of a class which derives from another has no reference to any instances of it's base class e.g.

Animal a = new Animal();
Animal b = new Dog();

Animal b has no reference or link to Animal a, they are 2 separate instances of type Animal. The difference is Animal b is actually of type Dog but has been cast as an Animal. When you cast up/down the inheritance hierarchy then the reference doesn't change (think the technical term for this is called reference conversion) therefore:

Dog d = (Dog)b;

Still refers to the same object as Animal b does, it's just a different type of reference.

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Yes true, but in this case what is the advantages we have for creating Animal b = new Dog(); Why if we arite a code like b.m1(); it will call Animal method if we don't use virtual override? –  Debhere Aug 27 '12 at 10:00
    
Can Anybody see a picture? I have uploaded a picture of my understanding of the "Animal / Dog: object. Can anbody see this. I don't in my browser. –  Debhere Aug 27 '12 at 10:04
1  
@Debhere it depends on the context, in most cases it's usually to avoid explicit casting. –  James Aug 27 '12 at 10:05
    
can anybody see a picture - yes your image is showing. –  James Aug 27 '12 at 10:06
class Animal
{
    public Animal() 
    { 
        Console.WriteLine("Animal constructor"); 
    }

    public  void  show()        
    {
        Console.WriteLine("animal");
    }

}

class Dog : Animal 
{ 
    public Dog() 
    { 
        Console.WriteLine("Dog constructor"); 
    }

    public  void show()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Dog");
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Animal B = new Dog();

        B.show();
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

In the above Program

B.show();

will call the base class show()

why, because, the Dog(), will also be having show() method ,this gets invoked since the reference type used was Animal , if you still want to call show() of Dog 's class use virtual and override concept

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Animal B = new Dog();

new operator returns the ref of Dog(); which gets stored in Animal B , so the ref b is pointing to dog

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