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In PHP, how do you use an external $var for use within a function in a class? For example, say $some_external_var sets to true and you have something like

class myclass {
bla ....
bla ....

function myfunction()  {

  if (isset($some_external_var)) do something ...

   } 

}


$some_external_var =true;

$obj = new myclass();
$obj->myfunction();

Thanks

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thanks everybody, its not a class dependent $var and its seldom used in just one area. Basically, this var is used to include another file for the function output. –  gus Jul 31 '09 at 18:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Global $some_external_var;

function myfunction()  {
  Global $some_external_var;
  if (!empty($some_external_var)) do something ...

   } 

}

But because Global automatically sets it, check if it isn't empty.

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Thanks Chacha102. –  gus Jul 31 '09 at 18:48

You'll need to use the global keyword inside your function, to make your external variable visible to that function.

For instance :

$my_var_2 = 'glop';

function test_2()
{
    global $my_var_2;
    var_dump($my_var_2);  // string 'glop' (length=4)
}

test_2();

You could also use the $GLOBALS array, which is always visible, even inside functions.


But it is generally not considered a good practice to use global variables: your classes should not depend on some kind of external stuff that might or might not be there !

A better way would be to pass the variables you need as parameters, either to the methods themselves, or to the constructor of the class...

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that's bad software design. In order for a class to function, it needs to be provided with data. So, pass that external var into your class, otherwise you're creating unnecessary dependencies.

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Why don't you just pass this variable during __construct() and make what the object does during construction conditional on the truth value of that variable?

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In newer versions of PHP you don't even need __construct() - you can create a function with the name of the class and it behaves as the constructor. For example, say you have a class called TestClass class TestClass { private x; function TestClass(y) { this->x = y; } } This would be a valid constructor. But I agree...I would pass it into the constructor. –  Joe Morgan Jul 31 '09 at 18:16
1  
Joe Morgan, I'm pretty sure it was that older versions didn't support the __construct magic method, and required the constructor to share the class's name. –  eyelidlessness Jul 31 '09 at 18:25
    
Argh, stupid broken half-Markdown. That was the __construct magic method. –  eyelidlessness Jul 31 '09 at 18:26
    
And I knew the name of his class how? –  Robert Elwell Jul 31 '09 at 18:26

Use Setters and Getters or maybe a centralized config like:

function config()
{
  static $data;

  if(!isset($data))
  {
    $data = new stdClass();
  }

  return $data;
}

class myClass
{
    public function myFunction()
    {
        echo "config()->myConfigVar: " . config()->myConfigVar;
    }
}

and the use it:

config()->myConfigVar = "Hello world";

$myClass = new myClass();
$myClass->myFunction();

http://www.evanbot.com/article/universally-accessible-data-php/24

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