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Introduction

I've found plenty of information about the Too many open files exception on the Web but I couldn't solve this strange case. As I've read, the exception is thrown when the number of opened file descriptors by process defined in the OS is exceeded. The nature of these files is diverse. Files could be sockets, documents, etc. And I've found robust and secure ways to open files that I have implemented in my Java application.

The application is a short program that downloads Web pages using the Boilerpipe algorithm. This way I get the most representative contents of that site. Then, I write it in an appropriate format (TREC format) to disk. The URLs of these websites are taken from a MySQL database that I access using the JDBC connector.

So, I think that the exception can be thrown form three different places:

  • Connection to database
  • HTTP Connection to the web sites
  • Opening and writing files

Although, as I said, I think that I use a correct way of opening and writing those files.

Problem

There are thousands of URL's to process and the exception is thrown after a while (what makes it also very difficult to debug...). I don't know if that matters, but URLs are classified into different categories and I run different instances of the program to speed up the whole process. Categories don't overlap so there shouldn't be any problem.

Code

To make it more readable I'm going to show just those three parts of my code simplified:

  1. Database access

    // Connect to database
    Connection dbconn = null;
    
    try {
        String dbUrl = "jdbc:mysql://" + dbServer + "/" + dbName;
        Class.forName ("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver").newInstance ();
        dbconn = DriverManager.getConnection(dbUrl, dbUser, dbPass);
        System.out.println ("Database connection established");
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        System.err.println ("Cannot connect to database server");
        System.exit(-1);
    }
    
    System.out.println("  Downloading category: " + category);                  
    
    Statement s = null;
    try {
        s = dbconn.createStatement();
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        System.err.println ("Error on creating the statement");
        System.exit(-1);
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    
    String q = "SELECT resource,topic FROM " + 
            "content_links " + 
            "WHERE topic LIKE 'Top/" + category + "%';";
    
    try {
        s.executeQuery(q);
    } catch(Exception e) {
        System.err.println ("Error on executing the SQL statement");
        System.exit(-1);
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    
    ResultSet rs = null;
    try {
        rs = s.getResultSet ();
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        System.err.println ("Error on getting the result set");
        System.exit(-1);
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    
    
    int count = 0, webError = 0;
    
    // work with the result set
    try {
        while (rs.next ()) {
    
            // MAIN LOOP
        }
    
    } catch (SQLException e) {
        System.err.println ("Error on getting next item");
        System.exit(-1);
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    
    // Close connection to database
    if (dbconn != null) {
        try {
            dbconn.close ();
            System.out.println ("  Database connection terminated");
        } catch (Exception e) { /* ignore close errors */ }
    }
    
  2. HTTP connection, extract site's title and boilerpipe filter

    try {
    
        String title = "";
        org.jsoup.nodes.Document doc = Jsoup.connect(urlVal).get();
    
        for (Element element : doc.select("*")) {
            if (element.tagName().equalsIgnoreCase("title")) {
                title = element.text();
            }
            if (!element.hasText() && element.isBlock()) {
                element.remove();
            }
        }
    
        String contents = "";
        contents = NumWordsRulesExtractor.INSTANCE.getText(doc.text());                                         
        storeFile(id, urlVal, catVal, title, contents);
                }
    } catch (BoilerpipeProcessingException e) {
        System.err.println("Connection failed to: " + urlVal);
    } catch (MalformedURLException e1) {
        System.err.println("Malformed URL: " + urlVal);
    } catch(Exception e2) {
        System.err.println("Exception: " + e2.getMessage());
        e2.getStackTrace();
    }
    
  3. Writing file

    private static void storeFile(String id, String url, String cat, String title, String contents) {
    BufferedWriter out = null;
    try {
        out = new BufferedWriter(
                new OutputStreamWriter(
                new FileOutputStream(
                new File(path + "/" + id + ".webtrec")),"UTF8"));
    
        // write in TREC format
        out.write("...");
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            out.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    
share|improve this question
    
You should post the stack trace of the exception you get. –  Flavio Aug 27 '12 at 10:10
    
How often do you call the "database access" part? When do you close the database connection? –  Flavio Aug 27 '12 at 10:11
    
@Flavio: I only execute that part once because the SQL statement queries all the URLs for the given category. Then I loop thorough the result set in that while statement. The databse is closed at the end of the execution, I'll edit the question and add that part of code that I missed. I'll try to get that stacktrace but It will take me a while as I said, may be some days! –  Kits89 Aug 27 '12 at 10:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yup. You are leaking file descriptors.

In the first case you open a DB connection and never close it. The connection will typically use a socket or something to talk to the database. Since you don't close the connection, the socket won't be closed, and you will leak a file descriptor.

In the second case, I suspect that the call to Jsoup.connect(urlVal) is opening a connection, which you don't then close. That will result in a file descriptor leak.

Correction - there is no close() method on the Connection interface. It looks like the actual connection must be created and then closed internally by the get method. Assuming that is so, there is no file descriptor leak in the second case.

The third case does not leak file descriptors. However, if you fail to open the file, out.close(); statement will attempt to call a method on null ... and will throw a NPE.


The solution is to find all of the places where you open files, database connection, http connections, and make sure that the handle is always closed.

One way to do it is to put the close() call (or equivalent) in a finally block ... but make sure that you don't accidentally call close() on null.

The other way to do it is to use the Java 7 "try with resource" syntax. For example:

private static void storeFile(String id, String url, String cat, 
                              String title, String contents) {
    try (BufferedWriter out = new BufferedWriter(
                new OutputStreamWriter(
                new FileOutputStream(
                new File(path + "/" + id + ".webtrec")),"UTF8"))) {
        // write in TREC format
        out.write("...");
        out.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

(Note however that the Java 7 syntax can only be used with resources that implement the new Closeable interface.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1: It helped me a lot, thank you. I'll check all this. I thought that Jsoup was closing it inside its method. I'll have to check it better.. –  Kits89 Aug 27 '12 at 10:27
    
That's weird, I don't see any close method in the Connection interface... API –  Kits89 Aug 27 '12 at 10:37

To add to Stephen's comprehensive analysis. I recommend using a connection pool for the database, although, as Stephen has pointed, unless you're closing these connections, you'll drain the pool close, but at least it will be easier to discover why...

I've not seen any evidence, but you should be using some kind of Thread pool to download the pages, this will help to maximize the resources of the system. Some of executor service would suffice. Like I say, you're probably already doing this, but you didn't show any code (or comment) for it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Connection pools are a good idea ... though they don't actually cure this problem. –  Stephen C Aug 27 '12 at 10:19
    
In fact, I haven't implemented a connection pool nor any thread strategy. Do you mean that I could use threads over the result set that I get from the DB? It seems that I can't get next rows until I've processed the current one... –  Kits89 Aug 27 '12 at 10:29
1  
@kits89 I'd use a thread pool to seed all the processing tasks. That is, I'd read all the rows from the database, for each row, I'd place a task on an queue (executor service), which using a limited thread pool, would process the tasks in the queue. –  MadProgrammer Aug 27 '12 at 14:59
1  
@stephenc yes, your right, ts wouldn't solve the underlying problem, what it would do, is prevent him from creating/obtaining any new connections if he fails to close/return them to the pool. It isolates the problem –  MadProgrammer Aug 27 '12 at 15:02

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