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I have a obj file which stores data this way:

v value1 value2 value3  
f value1 value2 value3

First I calculate a normal for the face and then assign for each vertex of that face:

for(int i = 0; i < verticesInd.size(); i+=3)
{
    glm::vec3 normal = glm::normalize(glm::cross(glm::vec3(vertices[verticesInd[i + 1]]) - glm::vec3(vertices[verticesInd[i]]), glm::vec3(vertices[verticesInd[i + 2]]) - glm::vec3(vertices[verticesInd[i]])));
    out_Normals[i] = normal;
    out_Normals[i + 1] = normal;
    out_Normals[i + 2] = normal;
}

For achieve a flat shading I can duplicate vertices:

for(int i = 0; i < verticesInd.size(); i++)
{
    out_Vertices.push_back(vertices[verticesInd[i]]);
} 

and then draw the object using glDrawArrays:

glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, out_Vertices.size());

For achieve a smooth shading I need to average normals for each vertex but I have no idea how to find adjacent faces.

Edit1: I didn't notice a single s parameter before f:

v value1 value2 value3
s 1  
f value1 value2 value3

Edit2: Normals averaging

glm::vec3 tNormal;
for(int i = 0; i < vertices.size(); i++)
{
    for(int  j = 0; j < verticesInd.size(); j++)
    {
        if(verticesInd[j] == i)
        {
            tNormal += faceNormals[j / 3];
        }
    }
    aNormals.push_back(glm::normalize(tNormal));
    tNormal = glm::vec3(0,0,0);
}

Edit 3 Face normals:

for(int i = 0; i < verticesInd.size(); i+=3)
{
    glm::vec3 normal = glm::normalize(glm::cross(glm::vec3(vertices[verticesInd[i + 1]]) - glm::vec3(vertices[verticesInd[i]]), glm::vec3(vertices[verticesInd[i + 2]]) - glm::vec3(vertices[verticesInd[i]])));
    faceNormals.push_back(normal);
}
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In most object formats adjacent faces should be sharing vertices. Finding the smooth shaded normal at a vertex should just then be a question of averaging the normal of any face which uses that vertex.

I suggest that you create an additional new array the same size as your existing vertex array.

Iterate over each face, and for each vertex index, add that vertice's face normal to the new array.

At the end of the process, normalise the result normal vectors and then use that instead of the previously computed face normals.

If I understand your data structures correctly, it would look something like this:

glm::vec3 aNormals[];   // one for each vertex - use the appropriate constructor

for (int i = 0; i < verticesInd.size(); ++i) {
    int f = i / 3;                 // which face is this index part of (3 per face?)
    int v = verticesInd[i];        // which vertex number is being used
    aNormals[v] += faceNormals[f]; // add the face normal to this vertex
}

// now normalise aNormals
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The object has 50000 vertices and 100000 faces. For each vertex I need to check each face and the computations take ~15 minutes on my cpu. –  Irbis Aug 28 '12 at 12:08
    
@Irbis it sounds like you're iterating over the structure the wrong way around. See update. –  Alnitak Aug 28 '12 at 12:13
    
"@Irbis it sounds like you're iterating over the structure the wrong way around" - please look at Edit2, it brings correct results. –  Irbis Aug 28 '12 at 14:30
    
Edit2 shows the code related with the first comment. –  Irbis Aug 28 '12 at 14:55
    
@Irbis so verticesInd is the (original) array f from the file mapping triples of vertex offsets to faces? (and yes, that's what I meant by "the wrong way around" - you have an array from face -> vertex number so you should use it). –  Alnitak Aug 28 '12 at 15:07
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I have no idea how to find adjacent faces.

Add a list of faces to your temporary, in-OBJ-loader vertex storage. As you're processing the face lines add the new face to the face list of each vertex it references.

That way you can spin over all the vertexes at the end, look up the face(s) it belonged to, grab the face normals, and average them.

If your OBJ doesn't have such nice baked-in connectivity information (and there's no requirement that it has to) then you'll have to do a nearest-neighbor search on each vertex to find vertexes (and corresponding faces) that are near it. Use your favorite spatial index to speed those sorts of queries up.

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Follow this guy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRD_zN0SWh0&feature=plcp on per fragment lighting. It contains the same equations for finding the normals on a per vertex basis as far as I know.

You would need a list of faces. If you've ever seen a wavefront obj. They contain multiple triangle indices 4,7,2 1,2,3. Each 3 numbers representing a face. With a normal Mesh each point can only be used 3 times. If you find each group that has a 3 you can find each face. Find their corresponding normal values and then average.

Alnitak has valid info too. You have a list of vertices, then list them off as groups of 3 so that you can reuse vertices(share) as face data.

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My per fragment lighting works fine and the video which you attached above has nothing to do with the problem. I need to average normals before I send them to the shader. –  Irbis Aug 27 '12 at 17:07
    
I don't see why you couldn't average them in the shader. If your object is static then pre-calculating normals is useful. otherwise you could just feed your normals to the shader in many ways. uniforms, attributes, vertex arrays, buffer objects and average them there. More on your current problem in the edit. –  Kaliber64 Aug 27 '12 at 21:18
    
My object is static so pre-calculating normals should be faster, but otherwise should I do it in the shader ? –  Irbis Aug 27 '12 at 21:49
    
you should not do it in the shader if it is only going to be calculated once. The shader will continue to calculate non changing numbers. Unless your object moves or your lights move you should pre-calculate it. I wouldn't because its easier to let the shader do it. But in terms of performance you could stop the shader from doing that work. –  Kaliber64 Aug 28 '12 at 6:01
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