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Slightly embarrassed to ask such a simple question but I've wasted an hour now and figure its a 30 second solution. The problem is how to edit an existing object that is provided as an input to a function. I've also played with the super-assignment <<- without success.

The example function uses 2 inputs (one for an object and one for its name). I just need a form of this that removes the need for the 'n' input.

m <- c(2,5,3,7,1,3,9,3,5)
dim(m) <- c(3,3)
m

f <- function(x, n) { # where 'n' is the object name of 'x'
  x[1,] <- c(1,2,3)
  assign(n, x, envir = .GlobalEnv)
}

f(m, 'm')
m

Thanks in advance.

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2  
Why do you want to do this? This can be dangerous, and goes against the grain of functional programming. What's wrong with writing x <- somefun(x)? –  Andrie Aug 27 '12 at 11:02
    
I only want a generic function that will edit the values of an existing object. Is that dangerous? I've tried other approaches but they fail because the function cannot identify global object 'x'.. –  geotheory Aug 27 '12 at 11:08
    
For instance these also fail: –  geotheory Aug 27 '12 at 11:11
    
f1 <- function(x) x[1,] <<- c(1,2,3); f1(m) –  geotheory Aug 27 '12 at 11:13
1  
What would you want to see if you tried, for example, f(2). –  seancarmody Aug 27 '12 at 11:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to provide the name as an extra argument; substitute will get that for you. To do things in the scope of the calling function you use eval with parent.frame.

f <- function(x) {
  eval(substitute( x[1,] <- c(1,2,3) ), parent.frame())
}

Then,

m <- c(2,5,3,7,1,3,9,3,5)
> dim(m) <- c(3,3)
> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    2    7    9
[2,]    5    1    3
[3,]    3    3    5
> f(m)
> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1    2    3
[2,]    5    1    3
[3,]    3    3    5

That said, modifying the caller's environment is generally a bad idea and it will usually lead to less confusing/fragile code if you just return the value and re-assign it to m instead. This is generally preferable.:

f <- function (x) {
    x[1,] <- c(1,2,3)
    x
}

m <- f(m)

However, I have occasionally found eval shenanigans to come in handy when I really needed to change an array in place and avoid an array copy.

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OK solved. Thanks @Andrie, sorry I misunderstood your reply.

Rookie error :(

f <- function(x) {
  x[1,] <- c(1,2,3)
  return(x)
}

m <- f(m)
m
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You should click the checkmark to indicate this is a satisfactory solution. –  Carl Witthoft Aug 27 '12 at 11:31

I am probably missing the point of why you want to do this, but this will do exactly what you want, I think:

m[1,] = c(1,2,3)

The value of m has been changed in the global environment.

I'm just guessing here, but often folks who are writing functions to take the "names" of objects find that R lists can be useful. If you find yourself wanting to manipulate variables based on names, consider using R lists instead. Remember that every member of a list can have a different data type if necessary.

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Normally I'd agree, but I was trying to develop a complex function. My error was to try and apply a 'f(x)' process to a situation demanding 'x <- f(x)' –  geotheory Aug 30 '12 at 16:20

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