Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a Map with int values and increase them by multiple threads. two or more threads might increase the same key.

ConcurrentHashMap documentation was very unclear to me since it sais that:

Retrieval operations (including get) generally do not block, so may overlap with update operations (including put and remove)

I wonder if the following code using ConcurrentHashMap will works correctly:

myMap.put(X, myMap.get(X) + 1);

if not, how can I manage such thing?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Concurrent map will not help thread safety of your code. You still can get race condition:

Thread-1: x = 1, get(x)
Thread-2: x = 1, get(x)
Thread-1: put(x + 1) => 2
Thread-2: put(x + 1) => 2

Two increments happened, but you still get only +1. You need a concurrent map only if you aim for modifying the map itself, not its content. Even the simplest HashMap is threadsafe for concurrent reads, given the map is not mutated anymore.

So instead of a threadsafe map for primitive type, you need a threadsafe wrapper for the type. Either something from java.util.concurrent.atomic or roll your own locked container if needing an arbitrary type.

share|improve this answer

One idea would be combining ConcurrentMap with AtomicInteger, which has a increment method.

 AtomicInteger current = map.putIfAbsent(key, new AtomicInteger(1));
 int newValue = current == null ? 1 :current.incrementAndGet();

or (more efficiently, thanks @Keppil) with an extra code guard to avoid unnecessary object creation:

 AtomicInteger current = map.get(key);
 if (current == null){
     current = map.putIfAbsent(key, new AtomicInteger(1));
 }
 int newValue = current == null ? 1 : current.incrementAndGet();
share|improve this answer
    
if you use a ConcurrentMap there is no point in also using atomic integers, ConcurrentHashMap.replace(K, V, V) is made for this. –  jolivier Aug 27 '12 at 11:52
1  
@jolivier replace is subject to retrying, whereas getAndIncrement is not. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 27 '12 at 11:55
1  
I usually check if the value exists before the putIfAbsent() to avoid creating a new AtomicInteger every time. –  Keppil Aug 27 '12 at 11:55
2  
@jolivier I'd definitely avoid implementing my own retry logic every time. For me this fully justifies the use of AtomicInteger. It does the retrying natively, in a way that cannot even be reproduced through Java. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 27 '12 at 12:02
1  
According to documentation docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… putIfAbsent may return null. Won't your code throw NPE in certain scenario? –  Tvaroh Jan 15 at 23:46

You could just put the operation in a synchronized (myMap) {...} block.

share|improve this answer

Best practice. You can use HashMap and AtomicInteger. Test code:

public class HashMapAtomicIntegerTest {
    public static final int KEY = 10;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        HashMap<Integer, AtomicInteger> concurrentHashMap = new HashMap<Integer, AtomicInteger>();
        concurrentHashMap.put(HashMapAtomicIntegerTest.KEY, new AtomicInteger());
        List<HashMapAtomicCountThread> threadList = new ArrayList<HashMapAtomicCountThread>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 500; i++) {
            HashMapAtomicCountThread testThread = new HashMapAtomicCountThread(
                    concurrentHashMap);
            testThread.start();
            threadList.add(testThread);
        }
        int index = 0;
        while (true) {
            for (int i = index; i < 500; i++) {
                HashMapAtomicCountThread testThread = threadList.get(i);
                if (testThread.isAlive()) {
                    break;
                } else {
                    index++;
                }
            }
            if (index == 500) {
                break;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("The result value should be " + 5000000
                + ",actually is"
                + concurrentHashMap.get(HashMapAtomicIntegerTest.KEY));
    }
}

class HashMapAtomicCountThread extends Thread {
    HashMap<Integer, AtomicInteger> concurrentHashMap = null;

    public HashMapAtomicCountThread(
            HashMap<Integer, AtomicInteger> concurrentHashMap) {
        this.concurrentHashMap = concurrentHashMap;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
            concurrentHashMap.get(HashMapAtomicIntegerTest.KEY)
                    .getAndIncrement();
        }
    }
}

Results:

The result value should be 5000000,actually is5000000

Or HashMap and synchronized, but much slower than the former

public class HashMapSynchronizeTest {

    public static final int KEY = 10;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        HashMap<Integer, Integer> hashMap = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();
        hashMap.put(KEY, 0);
        List<HashMapSynchronizeThread> threadList = new ArrayList<HashMapSynchronizeThread>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 500; i++) {
            HashMapSynchronizeThread testThread = new HashMapSynchronizeThread(
                    hashMap);
            testThread.start();
            threadList.add(testThread);
        }
        int index = 0;
        while (true) {
            for (int i = index; i < 500; i++) {
                HashMapSynchronizeThread testThread = threadList.get(i);
                if (testThread.isAlive()) {
                    break;
                } else {
                    index++;
                }
            }
            if (index == 500) {
                break;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("The result value should be " + 5000000
                + ",actually is" + hashMap.get(KEY));
    }
}

class HashMapSynchronizeThread extends Thread {
    HashMap<Integer, Integer> hashMap = null;

    public HashMapSynchronizeThread(
            HashMap<Integer, Integer> hashMap) {
        this.hashMap = hashMap;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
            synchronized (hashMap) {
                hashMap.put(HashMapSynchronizeTest.KEY,
                        hashMap
                                .get(HashMapSynchronizeTest.KEY) + 1);
            }
        }
    }
}

Resluts:

The result value should be 5000000,actually is5000000

Use ConcurrentHashMap will get the wrong results.

public class ConcurrentHashMapTest {

    public static final int KEY = 10;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, Integer> concurrentHashMap = new ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, Integer>();
        concurrentHashMap.put(KEY, 0);
        List<CountThread> threadList = new ArrayList<CountThread>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 500; i++) {
            CountThread testThread = new CountThread(concurrentHashMap);
            testThread.start();
            threadList.add(testThread);
        }
        int index = 0;
        while (true) {
            for (int i = index; i < 500; i++) {
                CountThread testThread = threadList.get(i);
                if (testThread.isAlive()) {
                    break;
                } else {
                    index++;
                }
            }
            if (index == 500) {
                break;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("The result value should be " + 5000000
                + ",actually is" + concurrentHashMap.get(KEY));
    }
}

class CountThread extends Thread {
    ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, Integer> concurrentHashMap = null;

    public CountThread(ConcurrentHashMap<Integer, Integer> concurrentHashMap) {
        this.concurrentHashMap = concurrentHashMap;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
            concurrentHashMap.put(ConcurrentHashMapTest.KEY,
                    concurrentHashMap.get(ConcurrentHashMapTest.KEY) + 1);
        }
    }
}

Results:

The result value should be 5000000,actually is11759

share|improve this answer
    
You can learn the principle from @vtmarvin 's answer –  wodong Aug 27 '12 at 13:00

Your current code changes the values of your map concurrently so this will not work.

If multiple threads can put values into your map, you have to use a concurrent map like ConcurrentHashMap with non thread safe values like Integer. ConcurrentMap.replace will then do what you want (or use AtomicInteger to ease your code).

If your threads will only change the values (and not add/change the keys) of your map, then you can use a standard map storing thread safe values like AtomicInteger. Then your thread will call:map.get(key).incrementAndGet() for instance.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.