Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an XML which might be like one of the following:

// #1
<A>
     <B>... stuff ...</B>
</A>

// #2
<B>... stuff ...</B>

I need to transform these into a response node which should look the same for both instances. Sort of like this:

<fooMethodResponse>
    ... one thing from A if A was root ...
    ... stuff from B ...
</fooMethodResponse>

How can I do this simplest without repeating myself? I have done this now:

<xsl:template match="/A">
        <fooMethodResponse>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="B" mode="get-B" />
        <xsl:element name="processId">
            <xsl:value-of select="@id" />
        </xsl:element>
    </fooMethodResponse>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="/B">
    <fooMethodResponse>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="." mode="get-B" />
    </fooMethodResponse>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="B" mode="get-B"></xsl:template>

Problem here is I'm repeating the response wrapper, and I'd like to only have that in one place. Figured I could do something like this:

<xsl:template match="/">
    <fooMethodResponse>
        <xsl:choose>
            <xsl:when test="node name is A">
            <xsl:when test="node name is B">
        </xsl:choose>
    </fooMethodResponse>
</xsl:template>

But I can't figure out how to write the test to check the node name of the root element. Are root elements handled differently somehow?


I'd like to give more precise examples, but is quite a bit of business stuff in there so I've tried to boil it down :p

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not sure about what you want to do, more precise input and output samples are needed. Nevertheless, the following XSLT (1.0) can be a base to solve your problem :

<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
    version="1.0">
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <fooMethodResponse>
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
        </fooMethodResponse>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="A">
        <xsl:text>... one thing from A if A was root ...</xsl:text>
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="B">
        <xsl:text>... stuff from B ...</xsl:text>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

For input #1 :

<A>
     <B>... stuff ...</B>
</A>

Result #1 is :

<fooMethodResponse>... one thing from A if A was root ...
    ... stuff from B ...
</fooMethodResponse>

For input #2 :

<B>... stuff ...</B>

Result #2 is :

<fooMethodResponse>... stuff ...</fooMethodResponse>

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
so match="/" has higher priority than match="element", even though element is /? –  Svish Aug 27 '12 at 12:28
    
It's not a question of priority. When you transform a document with XSLT, it begins by applying a template to the root of the document match="/", if this template is defined then it performs the template or it uses a default template (that, in the case of root, only performs xsl:apply-templates). So the first template applied by an XSLT processor is match="/". Then it depends on your structure and what you write in your first template. –  Vincent Biragnet Aug 27 '12 at 12:37
    
Ahaa. Tested it out, and this seems to work great. Thanks! –  Svish Aug 27 '12 at 12:50

What you can do is combine patterns with the | operator e.g.

<xsl:template match="/A[B] | /B">
  <fooMethodResponse>...</fooMethodResponse>
</xsl:template>

Whether that makes sense or simplifies things in your case I am not sure as I don't understand what you want to put inside of fooMethodResponse for the two different elements. Consider to spell out each result sample for each possible input sample you have posted, your current single result sample is not clear to me.

share|improve this answer
    
Would B be "this" for both cases in that template? –  Svish Aug 27 '12 at 12:29
    
Try to adopt XSLT terminology, not OO terminology. The context node (w3.org/TR/xslt20/#xpath-dynamic-context) in that template is either an A element node or a B element node. –  Martin Honnen Aug 27 '12 at 13:01
    
Thanks. Total xslt newbie, so great to get the terminology corrected ;) –  Svish Aug 27 '12 at 13:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.