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I was wondering if any minimum spanning tree of a graph G can be provided by an execution of the algorithm Prim on this graph?

Does the Prim algorithm give us all the possible MST?

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I don't understand. Are you asking "If there are more then one MST, is the resulting MST from prim chosen at 'random'"? –  amit Aug 27 '12 at 12:25
    
no, i know that we can have more than one MST, but does the Prim algorithm give us all the possible MST? –  streaming116 Aug 27 '12 at 12:29
    
There could be exponential number of MST. Think of a clique with all weights=1. Prim is polynomial, so the answer is no - it doesn't give you all MSTs –  amit Aug 27 '12 at 12:33
    
Is there any larger question that you are trying to solve by finding all the MSTs, e.g. if a particular spanning tree is an MST? You might not actually need all the MSTs and, as others have pointed out, computing them all will require exponential runtime and storage in the worst case. –  smocking Aug 27 '12 at 17:07
    
Oh no the question was: Does the Prim algorithm give us all the possible MST (a proof is necessary) –  streaming116 Aug 28 '12 at 18:12

3 Answers 3

I was wondering if any minimum spanning tree of a graph G can be provided by an execution of the algorithm Prim on this graph?

Yes.

Prim's algorithm is known to be a good algorithm to find a minimum spanning tree.

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Can you prove it please? –  streaming116 Aug 27 '12 at 12:28
    
I realy don't think that's what the OP is after. –  amit Aug 27 '12 at 12:31
    
It is quite obvious to me that an algorithm which iteratively removes edges while keeping distances (or weights) constant will eventually give the MST. –  nurettin Aug 27 '12 at 12:31
    
That's the problem. There isn't only one MST for a graph –  streaming116 Aug 27 '12 at 12:32
    
OK, but this is not obvious from your question. I understood "any" as "any of" not "all of". –  nurettin Aug 27 '12 at 12:34

Since Prim's algorithm constructs a MST from a weighted, connected, undirected graph, yes, you can use it to get a minimum spanning tree from such a graph. If your graph is not connected it won't work (but neither will any other algorithm because there is no spanning tree, then). If your graph is not weighted it will just create a spanning tree.

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I want to use it to have ALL the MST... –  streaming116 Aug 27 '12 at 12:31

If you use Prim's once to get a MST then delete an edge. Then use prim's again to see if you can still get a MST of the same length. If you do, repeat, otherwise put the edge back and remove another edge. It will be slowish ... Perhaps only remove heavy edges?

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