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i am trying to add last line to the file which i am creating. how is it possible to detect the last line of a file in awk before END ? i need to do this because the variables dont work in the END block, so i am trying to avoid using END.

awk ' { do some things..; add a new last line into file;}'

before END, i dont want this:

awk 'END{print "somethins new" >> "newfile.txt"}'

thanks a lot in advance..

share|improve this question
    
Which variables in particular do you need that are not available in the END block? Most of the variables (NR, NF, FNR, etc. ) have very reasonable values in the END block. –  William Pursell Aug 28 '12 at 15:56
    
the variables i need are some local variables which play the main role in creating the file.. e.g.: print $0 >> sprintf("%s/%s_%s.txt", user, mode, FILENAME) those user and mode are not available in END which are becoming the name of the file... –  doniyor Aug 28 '12 at 19:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One option is to use getline function to process the file. It returns 1 on sucess, 0 on end of file and -1 on an error.

awk '
    FNR == 1 {

        ## Process first line.
        print FNR ": " $0;

        while ( getline == 1 ) {
            ## Process from second to last line.
            print FNR ": " $0;
        }

        ## Here all lines have been processed.
        print "After last line";
    }
' infile

Assuming infile with this data:

one
two
three
four
five

Output will be:

1: one                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
2: two                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
3: three
4: four
5: five
After last line
share|improve this answer
    
great, this is what i want, i think. let me give a shot –  doniyor Aug 27 '12 at 12:45
    
@doniyor: Then don't accept the answer yet, because it could discourage other users to post different solutions. Do it when you are sure. Time is not a problem, isn't it? –  Birei Aug 27 '12 at 12:52
    
you are right :). i unchecked back. –  doniyor Aug 28 '12 at 6:57
    
Nicely done; unless there is a need to treat the first line special, you could rewrite the loop to use do { ... } while (getline == 1), in which case you don't need the print statement preceding the loop. –  mklement0 Feb 4 '14 at 17:45
    
This has been accepted but I do not really see the point as it can simply be done by: cat <file>; echo "line" >> <file> .. and adding things using awk can be simply done with what you "do not want". Using getline sounds like you want to use something else as you cannot pipe it till the process is done. –  mario Nov 1 '14 at 21:39

You can get the number of lines in a file using "wc -l" | getline filesize in the begin block and use NR == filesize to test the last line in the script body.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but my case is this: i have a huge file which i should sort into multiple small files. those multiple small files which i am creating at the moment should be in rtf format. so, i dont know in advance the number of lines of the new file.. :( –  doniyor Aug 27 '12 at 12:33
    
why don't you convert them to rtf after the awk? –  perreal Aug 27 '12 at 12:36
    
because the files i am creating and distributing are in different directories. after awk i have to look for the created files then, it is more job. –  doniyor Aug 27 '12 at 12:38
    
I would go for 'END { system"(convert_to_rtf "FILENAME); }' or doing similar with an array of names. I think this is cleaner. –  perreal Aug 27 '12 at 12:46
    
well, this is also good. but the only thing i am trying to achieve is that the file should be in landscape format, this is why the rtf code is there... \landscape –  doniyor Aug 28 '12 at 6:59
$ cat file 
1
2
3
4
5

Awk code :

awk '{ p=$0; print getline == 0 ? $0" I am last" : p RS $0}' file

Resulting

1
2
3
4
5 I am last
share|improve this answer

I know the answer was accepted, but it is simply wrong.

Because you do want to use awk as a parser and not as a code.

Awk should be used within some unix pipes and it should not be used within any logic.

I had the same problem and I solved it within awk like this:

nlines=wc -l <file>

cat | awk -v nl=${nlines} '{if (nl != NR) {print $0,",","\";} else {print;}}' >> ${someout}

There is an important point here: pipes, flush, and RAM.

If you make awk to spit out its output you can pipe it to the next processor.

If you use getline, and in particular within a loop, you might not see the end.

getline should be used only for a line and an eventual dependency on the next line.

I love awk, but we cannot do everything with it!

EDITED:

For whom down-voted the answer, I just want to present this script:

#! /bin/sh
#
# Generate random strings
cat /dev/urandom | tr -dc 'a-zA-Z0-9' | fold -w 32 | head -n 100000 > x.r.100000
cat /dev/urandom | tr -dc 'a-zA-Z0-9' | fold -w 32 | head -n 1000000 > x.r.1000000
cat /dev/urandom | tr -dc 'a-zA-Z0-9' | fold -w 32 | head -n 5000000 > x.r.5000000
#
# To save you time in case
#cat /dev/urandom | tr -dc 'a-zA-Z0-9' | fold -w 32 | head -n 10000000 > x.r.10000000
#
# Generate awk files
cat <<"EOF" > awkGetline.sh
#! /bin/sh
#
awk '
    FNR == 1 {

        ## Process first line.
        print FNR ": " $0;

        while ( getline == 1 ) {
            ## Process from second to last line.
            print FNR ": " $0;
        }
    }
' x.r
#
EOF
#
chmod +x awkGetline.sh
#
cat <<"EOF" > awkPlain.sh
#! /bin/sh
#
awk '
    {print FNR ": " $0;}
' x.r
#
EOF
#
# x.r.100000
#
chmod +x awkPlain.sh
#
# Execute awkGetline.sh 10 times on x.r.100000
rm -f x.t
cp x.r.100000 x.r
for runInstance in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10;
  do
  /usr/bin/time -p -a -o x.t ./awkGetline.sh > x.1.out;
done;
#
cat x.t | grep real | awk 'BEGIN {sum=0.0} {sum=sum+$2; print $2, sum/10;} END {print "SUM Getln", sum;}' | grep SUM
#

#
# Execute awkPlain.sh 10 times on x.r.100000
rm -f x.t
cp x.r.100000 x.r
for runInstance in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10;
  do
  /usr/bin/time -p -a -o x.t ./awkPlain.sh > x.1.out;
done;
#
cat x.t | grep real | awk 'BEGIN {sum=0.0} {sum=sum+$2; print $2, sum/10;} END {print "SUM Plain", sum;}' | grep SUM
#

#
# x.r.1000000
#
chmod +x awkPlain.sh
#
# Execute awkGetline.sh 10 times on x.r.1000000
rm -f x.t
cp x.r.1000000 x.r
for runInstance in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10;
  do
  /usr/bin/time -p -a -o x.t ./awkGetline.sh > x.1.out;
done;
#
cat x.t | grep real | awk 'BEGIN {sum=0.0} {sum=sum+$2; print $2, sum/10;} END {print "SUM Getln", sum;}' | grep SUM
#

#
# Execute awkPlain.sh 10 times on x.r.1000000
rm -f x.t
cp x.r.1000000 x.r
for runInstance in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10;
  do
  /usr/bin/time -p -a -o x.t ./awkPlain.sh > x.1.out;
done;
#
cat x.t | grep real | awk 'BEGIN {sum=0.0} {sum=sum+$2; print $2, sum/10;} END {print "SUM Plain", sum;}' | grep SUM
#


#
# x.r.5000000
#
chmod +x awkPlain.sh
#
# Execute awkGetline.sh 10 times on x.r.5000000
rm -f x.t
cp x.r.5000000 x.r
for runInstance in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10;
  do
  /usr/bin/time -p -a -o x.t ./awkGetline.sh > x.1.out;
done;
#
cat x.t | grep real | awk 'BEGIN {sum=0.0} {sum=sum+$2; print $2, sum/10;} END {print "SUM Getln", sum;}' | grep SUM
#

#
# Execute awkPlain.sh 10 times on x.r.5000000
rm -f x.t
cp x.r.5000000 x.r
for runInstance in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10;
  do
  /usr/bin/time -p -a -o x.t ./awkPlain.sh > x.1.out;
done;
#
cat x.t | grep real | awk 'BEGIN {sum=0.0} {sum=sum+$2; print $2, sum/10;} END {print "SUM Plain", sum;}' | grep SUM
#

exit;
# To save you time in case

#
# x.r.10000000
#
chmod +x awkPlain.sh
#
# Execute awkGetline.sh 10 times on x.r.10000000
rm -f x.t
cp x.r.10000000 x.r
for runInstance in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10;
  do
  /usr/bin/time -p -a -o x.t ./awkGetline.sh > x.1.out;
done;
#
cat x.t | grep real | awk 'BEGIN {sum=0.0} {sum=sum+$2; print $2, sum/10;} END {print "SUM Getln", sum;}' | grep SUM
#

#
# Execute awkPlain.sh 10 times on x.r.10000000
rm -f x.t
cp x.r.10000000 x.r
for runInstance in 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10;
  do
  /usr/bin/time -p -a -o x.t ./awkPlain.sh > x.1.out;
done;
#
cat x.t | grep real | awk 'BEGIN {sum=0.0} {sum=sum+$2; print $2, sum/10;} END {print "SUM Plain", sum;}' | grep SUM
#

And of course the first results:

tmp]$ ./awkRun.sh 
SUM Getln 0.78
SUM Plain 0.71
SUM Getln 7.2
SUM Plain 6.49
SUM Getln 35.91
SUM Plain 32.92

Where you save about 10% of the time just because of the getline.

Consider this within more complex logic and you might get even a worst picture. In this plain version, memory consideration are not accounted. And seems they do not play a role for this simple version. But memory might also play a role if you get into more complex logic ...

Of course try it on your machine.

This is why I was suggesting to consider other options, in general.

share|improve this answer
    
Please down vote the answer or we will get asked of out of mem troubles... –  mario Nov 1 '14 at 23:46
    
A note: Using pipes I could handle large data, a bit of time indeed, but I could get results. Using awk too. In commodity machines. Please do not make awk a monster, do not use getline. –  mario Nov 1 '14 at 23:58

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