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Given the following :

template <typename T0,typename T1,typename T2 , typename T3 , typename T4>
class Tuple
{
private:
    T0 v0;
    T1 v1;
    T2 v2;
    T3 v3;
    T4 v4;

public:
    void f()
    {
        cout << v0 << "," << v1 << "," << v2 << "," << v3 << "," << v4 << endl;
    }

};

I want to create a partial class with only two int-s , then I must specialize like this:

class NullType { };  // create an empty class
template <typename T0, typename T1>
class Tuple<T0,T1,NullType,NullType,NullType >
{
    private:
        T0 v0;
        T1 v1;
    public:
        void func()
        {
            cout << "i'm a specialization" << endl;
        }
};

But this implementation would require me to do :

Tuple<int,int,NullType,NullType,NullType> b;

so that's pretty ugly :)

Is there another way to implement a partial specialization without defining another (empty) class so I can do that : Tuple<int,int> b1; ?

share|improve this question
2  
Can you use a C++11-compiler with support for variadic templates? Have you considered using boost::tuple (or std::tuple if your compiler supports it)? – Björn Pollex Aug 27 '12 at 12:50
    
@BjörnPollex: I don't mind learning new things :) ... and I'm not using boost::tuple , is this supposed to solve that problem ? – ron Aug 27 '12 at 12:56
    
Simplest might be to just typedef it. – jthill Aug 27 '12 at 13:05
    
@jthill: Can you explain ? – ron Aug 27 '12 at 13:12
    
@BjörnPollex: Variadic templates are probably way beyond what is needed here. A simple template alias should suffice. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 27 '12 at 13:22
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can make T2 through T4 default template arguments and use void instead of the empty NullType class, e.g.:

template <typename T0,typename T1,typename T2=void , typename T3=void , typename T4=void> class Tuple { private:
    T0 v0;
    T1 v1;
    T2 v2;
    T3 v3;
    T4 v4;

public:
    void f()
    {
        cout << v0 << "," << v1 << "," << v2 << "," << v3 << "," << v4 << endl;
    }

};

template <typename T0, typename T1> class Tuple<T0,T1,void,void,void > {
    private:
        T0 v0;
        T1 v1;
    public:
        void func()
        {
            cout << "i'm a specialization" << endl;
        } };

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    Tuple<int,int> myTuple;
    myTuple.func(); 
    return 0;
}

See here for working example.

EDIT: or, you could just use boost::tuple or std::tuple with C++11 :)

share|improve this answer
3  
If using C++11, std::tuple is built-in, and probably preferred. – Richard J. Ross III Aug 27 '12 at 13:00
    
True, although I am still a bit hesitant to recommend C++11 features because not all compilers support it, which is especially problematic for code that is e.g. open-sourced. You're right though in that it's a built-in option and preferred in a lot of cases, so I updated my answer accordingly – Moritz Aug 27 '12 at 13:07
    
@Moritz: Nice , but that code is still using the empty class NullType ... any other way without it (without C++ 11) ? +1 – ron Aug 27 '12 at 19:27
    
@ron: you could use void instead of NullType, see edit. – Moritz Aug 28 '12 at 7:21

If your compiler supports C++11 template aliases that is quite simple to do:

template <typename T, typename U>
using tuple2 = tuple<T,U,NullType,NullType,NullType>;
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the elegant and simple solution, although OP wants to avoid "creating an empty class". – juanchopanza Aug 27 '12 at 13:29
1  
@juanchopanza: This does not create any class at all, only an alias. I understand from the question that what he wants is to avoid having to create an specialization (or a class that wraps it) and at the same time avoid having to type all the NullType in the variable declaration. I might have misunderstood it. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 27 '12 at 13:31
1  
Maybe I misunderstood. I though OP didn't want to declare class NullType{};. I didn't mean the template alias was a class! – juanchopanza Aug 27 '12 at 13:37

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