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I am working in win forms. Getting errors while doing following operation. It shows me System.OutOfMemoryException error when i try to run the operation around 2-3 times continuously. Seems .NET is not able to free the resouces used in operation. The file i am using for operation is quite big, around more than 500 MB.

My sample code is as below. Please help me how to resolve the error.

try
{
   using (FileStream target = new FileStream(strCompressedFileName, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write))
   using (GZipStream alg = new GZipStream(target, CompressionMode.Compress))
   {
       byte[] data = File.ReadAllBytes(strFileToBeCompressed);
       alg.Write(data, 0, data.Length);
       alg.Flush();
       data = null;
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
}
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2  
Instead of ReadAllBytes, open source file and use its Read method in a loop –  L.B Aug 27 '12 at 13:39
    
ReadAllBytes is the killer - this gets all your more than 500 MB to RAM –  Reniuz Aug 27 '12 at 13:39
    
Which line exactly is causing the OOM exception? –  aquinas Aug 27 '12 at 13:39
    
byte[] data = File.ReadAllBytes(strFileToBeCompressed); The line where OOM comes –  amit patel Aug 27 '12 at 13:41
1  
The accepted answer to your previous question still holds true stackoverflow.com/questions/12038694/… –  Ramhound Aug 27 '12 at 13:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A very rough example could be

// destFile - FileStream for destinationFile 
// srcFile - FileStream of sourceFile
using (GZipStream gz = new GZipStream(destFile, CompressionMode.Compress))
{
     byte[] src = new byte[1024];
     int count = sourceFile.Read(src, 0, 1024);
     while (count != 0)
     {
         gz.Write(src, 0, count );
         count = sourceFile.Read(src, 0, 1024);
     }
}
// flush, close, dispose ..

So basically I changed your ReadAllBytes to read only chunks of 1024 bytes.

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Yes, but CopyTo is easier. Also, use a larger buffer, like 8*1024 . –  Henk Holterman Aug 27 '12 at 13:45
    
Of course you are right Henk, but I do think amit can adapt this on his own. @CopyTo thx for the hint! –  Pilgerstorfer Franz Aug 27 '12 at 13:48

Replace ReadAllBytes with Stream.CopyTo

using (FileStream target = new FileStream(strCompressedFileName, FileMode.Create, FileAccess.Write))
using (GZipStream alg = new GZipStream(target, CompressionMode.Compress))
{
    using (var fileToRead = File.Open(.....))
    {
        fileToRead.CopyTo(alg);
    }
}
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1  
That will automatically use a sensible buffer size, but if you want to specify a buffer size there is a CopyTo() overload to do so. It is not necessary IMO, just letting the OP know it's there. The default buffer size is just 4096. –  Matthew Watson Aug 27 '12 at 13:46

You can try to use this method to compress file MSDN link

    public static void Compress(FileInfo fileToCompress)
    {
        using (FileStream originalFileStream = fileToCompress.OpenRead())
        {
            using (FileStream compressedFileStream = File.Create(fileToCompress.FullName + ".gz"))
            {
               using (GZipStream compressionStream = new GZipStream(compressedFileStream, CompressionMode.Compress))
               {
                      originalFileStream.CopyTo(compressionStream);                                
               }
            }
        }
    }

usage:

string directoryPath = @"c:\users\public\reports";

DirectoryInfo directorySelected = new DirectoryInfo(directoryPath);

foreach (FileInfo fileToCompress in directorySelected.GetFiles())
{
    Compress(fileToCompress);
}
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