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Over the course of development of a significantly large project, we've accumulated a lot of unit tests. A lot of these tests start servers, connect to these servers and close the servers and clients, usually in the same process.

However, these tests randomly fail with a "Failed to bind address 127.0.0.1:(port)". When the test is re-run, the error usually disappears.

Now, we thought this was a problem with our tests, but we decided to write a small test in Clojure, which I'll post below (and comment for the non-Clojure people).

(ns test
  (:import [java.net Socket ServerSocket]))

(dotimes [n 10000] ; Run the test ten thousand times
  (let [server (ServerSocket. 10000) ; Start a server on port 10000
        client (Socket. "localhost" 10000) ; Start a client on port 10000
        p (.getLocalPort client)] ; Get the local port of the client
    (.close client) ; Close the client
    (.close server) ; Close the server
    (println "n = " n) ; Debug
    (println "p = " p) ; Debug
    (println "client = " client) ; Debug
    (println "server = " server) ; Debug
    (let [server (ServerSocket. p)] ; Start a server on the local port of the client we just closed
      (.close server) ; Close the server
      (println "client = " client) ; Debug
      (println "server = " server) ; Debug
    ))
  )

The exception appears, at random, on the line where we start the second server. It appears that Java is holding onto the local port - even though the client on that port has already been closed.

So, my question: Why on earth is Java doing this, and why is it so seemingly random?

EDIT: Someone suggested I set the socket's reuseAddr to true. I've done this, and nothing has changed, so here's the code below.

(ns test
  (:import [java.net Socket ServerSocket InetSocketAddress]))

(dotimes [n 10000] ; Run the test ten thousand times
  (let [server (ServerSocket. )] ; Create a server socket
    (. server (setReuseAddress true)) ; Set the socket to reuse address
    (. server (bind (InetSocketAddress. 10000))) ; Bind the socket
    (let  [client (Socket. "localhost" 10000) ; Start a client on port 10000
           p (.getLocalPort client)] ; Get the client's local port
      (.close client) ; Close the client
      (.close server) ; Close the server
;      (. Thread (sleep 1000)) ; A sleep for testing
      (println "n = " n) ; Debug
      (println "p = " p) ; Debug
      (println "client = " client) ; Debug
      (println "server = " server) ; Debug
      (let [server (ServerSocket. )] ; Create a server socket
        (. server (setReuseAddress true)) ; Set the socket to reuse address
        (. server (bind (InetSocketAddress. p))) ; Bind the socket to the local port of the client we just had
        (.close server) ; Close the server
        (println "client = " client) ; Debug
        (println "server = " server) ; Debug
      )))
  )

I've also noticed that a sleep of 10msec or even 100msec does not prevent the problem. 1000msec has (so far) managed to prevent it, however.

EDIT 2: Someone put me on to SO_LINGER - but I can't find a way to set that on the ServerSockets. Anyone have any ideas on that?

EDIT 3: Turns out that SO_LINGER is disabled by default. What else can we look at?

UPDATE: The problem has been solved for the most part, using dynamic port allocation over a range of 10,000 or so ports. However, I'd still like to see what people can come up with.

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3  
I suspect it's not Java doing it, it's just the way TCP ports work. When you call close() on a socket, it's up to the OS to free it up at its leisure. Sometimes it stays for a couple of seconds, maybe even minutes. (As closing itself involves an exchange of messages between the two peers.) If you do a netstat you're going to see the socket in a TIME_WAIT state. –  biziclop Aug 27 '12 at 14:37
    
That sounds reasonable; though I haven't noticed anything like that in netstat –  gdude2002 Aug 27 '12 at 14:40
    
I suspect as you're using the local loopback interface, your socket isn't open for long enough for netstat to "catch" it. But if you try to open a new one straight away, it will still be there. Try to put a Thread.sleep(1000) there just as an experiment. Does it still do it? –  biziclop Aug 27 '12 at 14:44
    
Setting a sleep of 10 doesn't help, I'm incrementing it by adding 0s on the end to see if that changes anything. –  gdude2002 Aug 27 '12 at 14:46
    
Still fails at 100 but 1000 seems to be going fine. I'll try the setReuseAddr method next. –  gdude2002 Aug 27 '12 at 15:04

3 Answers 3

I'm not (too) with the Clojure syntax, but you should invoke socket.setReuseAddr(true). This allows the program to reuse the port, even if there may be sockets in the TIME_WAIT state.

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1  
I still get the same problem. I'll update my code in the main question. –  gdude2002 Aug 27 '12 at 15:11

The test itself is invalid. Testing this behaviour is pointless, and has nothing to do with any required application behaviour: it is just exercising a corner condition in the TCP stack, which certainly no application should try to rely on. I would expect that opening a listening socket on a port that had just been an outbound connected port would never succeed at all due to TIME_WAIT, or at best succeed half the time due to uncertainty as to which end issued the close first.

I would remove the test. The rest of it doesn't do anything useful either,

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This particular test exists because the behaviour it illustrates randomly fails one of the 900 other tests or so in the application. My fix is probably going to be testing a range of 10,000 ports until one is openable, but since the goal of this question is to learn, I definitely wouldn't call it pointless. –  gdude2002 Aug 28 '12 at 6:07
    
Don't put words into my mouth. I didn't say the question was pointless. I said the test was pointless. If your application really relies on being able to listen to a port that has just been used as an outbound port, it is deeply flawed, and needs to be fixed, rather than wasting time on tests that should never have been written and have no reason to ever pass. And if the test is only there because of another test, remove them both: they are both invalid. Somebody in the past clearly didn't know much about TCP. –  EJP Aug 28 '12 at 10:05
    
The test/question is here to demonstrate something we thought was strange. The test was originally written because that was happening. It doesn't /rely/ on this behavior, but due to the volume of things being processed and the fact that the user can plug whatever they like into the configs, it's very possible that it might happen in a real-world case. –  gdude2002 Aug 28 '12 at 14:10
    
@gdude2002 So the test just demonstrates a possible failure. Nothing you can do about it and no point in testing it. As I said above, what is surprising is that it ever passed, if it ever did. –  EJP Aug 28 '12 at 23:23
    
Sure, but I wouldn't learn if I didn't test this stuff, right? It may be surprising to you, but it certainly wasn't obvious to me or some of the other users here. I solved the problem using dynamic port testing and allocation in the end. –  gdude2002 Aug 29 '12 at 7:55

You might try setReuseAddress(true) on the server sockets.

If another socket on the same port is in the TIME_WAIT state after closing, this flag will allow the socket to bind to the port anyway.

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1  
This doesn't seem to help. I've updated my question. –  gdude2002 Aug 27 '12 at 15:14
    
Does reuseaddr make any difference in how long the sleep has to be before your unit test works? In other words, does it work with 1000 ms with reuseaddr but requires a longer interval without reuseaddr? –  antlersoft Aug 28 '12 at 17:01
    
It honestly makes no difference at all, which I do find rather odd.. –  gdude2002 Aug 29 '12 at 7:55

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