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Under what scenarios would one want to use

public async Task AsyncMethod(int num)

instead of

public async void AsyncMethod(int num)

The only scenario that I can think of is if you need the task to be able to track it's progress.

Additionally, in the following method, are the async and await keywords unnecessary?

  public static async void AsyncMethod2(int num)
    {
        await Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Thread.Sleep(num));
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 101 down vote accepted

1) Normally, you would want to return a Task. The main exception should be when you need to have a void return type (for events). If there's no reason to disallow having the caller await your task, why disallow it?

2) async methods that return void are special in another aspect: they represent top-level async operations, and have additional rules that come into play when your task returns an exception. The easiest way is to show the difference is with an example:

static async void f()
{
    await h();
}

static async Task g()
{
    await h();
}

static async Task h()
{
    throw new NotImplementedException();
}

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    f();
}

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    g();
}

private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    GC.Collect();
}

f's exception is always "observed". An exception that leaves a top-level asynchronous method is simply treated like any other unhandled exception. g's exception is never observed. When the garbage collector comes to clean up the task, it sees that the task resulted in an exception, and nobody handled the exception. When that happens, the TaskScheduler.UnobservedTaskException handler runs. You should never let this happen. To use your example,

public static async void AsyncMethod2(int num)
{
    await Task.Factory.StartNew(() => Thread.Sleep(num));
}

Yes, use async and await here, they make sure your method still works correctly if an exception is thrown.

for more information see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj991977.aspx

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This is very helpful, thank you! –  user981225 Aug 27 '12 at 15:45
1  
I meant f instead of g in my comment. The exception from f is passed to the SynchronizationContext. g will raise UnobservedTaskException, but UTE no longer crashes the process if it's not handled. There are some situations where it's acceptable to have "asynchronous exceptions" like this that are ignored. –  Stephen Cleary Aug 28 '12 at 13:07
1  
If you have WhenAny with multiple Tasks resulting in exceptions. You often only have to handle the first one, and you often want to ignore the others. –  Stephen Cleary Aug 28 '12 at 13:29
1  
@StephenCleary Thanks, I guess that's a good example, although it depends on the reason you call WhenAny in the first place whether it's okay to ignore the other exceptions: the main use case I have for it still ends up awaiting the remaining tasks when any finishes, with or without an exception. –  hvd Aug 28 '12 at 13:41
2  
@user981225 Indeed, but that then becomes the responsibility of g's caller: every method that calls g should be async and use await too. This is a guideline, not a hard rule, you can decide that in your specific program, it's easier to have g return void. –  hvd Aug 28 '12 at 20:12

I have come across this very usefull article about async and void written by Jérôme Laban: http://www.jaylee.org/post/2012/07/08/c-sharp-async-tips-and-tricks-part-2-async-void.aspx

The bottom line is that an async+void can crash the system and usually should be used only on the UI side event handlers.

The reason behind this is the Synchronization Context used by the AsyncVoidMethodBuilder, being none in this example. When there is no ambient Synchronization Context, any exception that is unhandled by the body of an async void method is rethrown on the ThreadPool. While there is seemingly no other logical place where that kind of unhandled exception could be thrown, the unfortunate effect is that the process is being terminated, because unhandled exceptions on the ThreadPool effectively terminate the process since .NET 2.0. You may intercept all unhandled exception using the AppDomain.UnhandledException event, but there is no way to recover the process from this event.

When writing UI event handlers, async void methods are somehow painless because exceptions are treated the same way found in non-async methods; they are thrown on the Dispatcher. There is a possibility to recover from such exceptions, with is more than correct for most cases. Outside of UI event handlers however, async void methods are somehow dangerous to use and may not that easy to find.

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