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In the following code, I don't get any warning or compile error if I return NSMutableArray instead of NSArray which is the method's return type.

But is it good practice to convert return value to NSArray by using -copy method like the following code?
Or should I return NSMutableArray?

+(NSArray *)returnImutableArray {
    NSMutableArray *arr = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    [arr addObject:@"a"];
    [arr addObject:@"b"];

    //return arr; // no warning
    return [arr copy];
}
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if you don't use ARC, your code have a potential leak –  tikhop Aug 27 '12 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think this is essentially personal preference. You incur a (probably small) performance penalty by copying the array before returning it. The upside is that you'll completely prevent mutation of the result further down the line. However, I don't usually go to the trouble. Because the declared return type of the method is an immutable NSArray, the compiler will warn you if you try to call one of NSMutableArray's mutation methods on it unless you go out of your way to prevent that (by casting to NSMutableArray).

So, in short, it's personal preference and I personally don't generally bother with the immutable copy.

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thanks for clear explanation. –  js_ Aug 28 '12 at 11:49

This all depends on what you want to achieve with the array.

If you really don't want or need to modify the returned array, return it as an NSArray. You could as well return it as an array, without copying it.

In both cases, don't forget the memory management.

You should never return anything with a retain count >0.

+(NSArray *)returnImutableArray {
    NSMutableArray *arr = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    [arr addObject:@"a"];
    [arr addObject:@"b"];

    NSArray * returnArray = [NSArray arrayWithArray:arr];
    [arr release];
    //return arr; // no warning
    return returnArray;
}

Or you could do so:

+(NSArray *)returnImutableArray {
    NSMutableArray *arr = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    [arr addObject:@"a"];
    [arr addObject:@"b"];
    //return arr; // no warning
    return [arr autorelease];
}

There's no need to copy the NSMutableArray as it extends the NSArray so your code will never break if you do so.

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I assumed his code was meant to be compiled with ARC. –  Andrew Madsen Aug 27 '12 at 15:47
    
@AndrewMadsen you're right. I use ARC. I'm not good at non-ARC. –  js_ Aug 28 '12 at 11:51
    
IMHO any one using the iOS SDK should be comfortable without ARC before compiling with ARC... –  flovilmart Aug 28 '12 at 17:38

I return an immutable copy of interior mutable instances by default. Not just NSArray, but several other types.

I don't want mutable objects floating around, although it's not a problem that it mutates as long as you treat it as concrete.

I consider it a better default because it minimizes shallow copying if shared. That is, if you take the result and assign it to one or more objects which are copy properties, then all those actions must make concrete shallow copies, when they could effectively retain. This is the same reason you should favor copy for properties of these types, rather than retain when declaring properties.

In some cases, you just know its scope is limited and that the mutable won't get out -- in that case, I may not bother making the copy.

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1  
I don't quite understand the reasoning here. You're creating a copy on return because the caller might later have to make a copy on an assign. Why not just let the copy happen at the assign? The likelihood that the result will be copied multiple times seems very small compared to the likelihood that it will never have to be copied. I agree with using copy on appropriate properties of course. –  Rob Napier Aug 27 '12 at 16:08
    
@RobNapier it eliminates propagation of the mutable. i tried to write up a better response for you, but effectively wound up echoing my answer. perhaps we write differently. perhaps our programs are statistically very different. part of the reason is also to make a solid and robust program -- to avoid pushing the responsibility of ensuring immutability on to clients. curious: are there no cases where you would return a concrete copy, rather than returning a mutable local? (array, data, dictionary, string, set, etc) –  justin Aug 27 '12 at 17:02
1  
I can't imagine one. I'm trying to imagine a bug this would prevent that doesn't involve the caller being insane (which I intentionally do not try to protect myself from). The caller doesn't need to ensure immutability. He has it. I returned an NSArray interface. The internal structure isn't his business. That it could be mutated through violation of the API (and warning suppression) by the caller is true of many immutable objects (foo->bar = baz, private methods, etc). I of course just mean this for local; returning an ivar is a different problem (and often a hard performance question). –  Rob Napier Aug 27 '12 at 18:20
    
@RobNapier you interpreted "ensuring immutability" for semantic reasons; i was writing about the case of the client who says "oh, this string/array/blah will be used in several places, i'd better make an immutable copy before doling it out" -- not needed; a mutable instance was not returned. and even if they did wind up copying it, it would be a "copy of an immutable object". the "insanity" you speak of is allowed to pass through id and collections in Cocoa. if a programmer error is made, it is likely to be more localized. i quarantine mutables and try to maximize sharing. (cont) –  justin Aug 27 '12 at 19:08
    
(cont) anyways, it seems clear you've made up your mind on this subject. i've done my homework, and i know how i like my programs to work. we certainly don't need to agree. –  justin Aug 27 '12 at 19:08

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