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I came across the need to return a value from one function to another and for a while scratched my head in confusion when this simple task didn't work. I then realised I was operating within a closure function (or anonymous function?) and can't find documentation on how to release a variable out of such a function's scope.

For example, this doesn't work:

function aFunc()
{
   var result;
   object.event = function(){
      result = true;
   }
   return result;
}

Nor does returning from inside the closure. Do I need to do both? I tried using a global variable within the largest scope possible (outside of all functions) and this didn't work either. What am I missing?

I'm not sure whether I'm using the term closure correctly, I'm referring to the anonymous function.

Thanks.

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to call the closure:

function aFunc() {
   var result;
   object.event = function() {
      result = true;
   };
   object.event();
   return result;
}

Or, if it runs elsewhere, this is a timing issue. You can have something like a promise:

function aFunc() {
   var promise = { hasRun: false, result: null };
   object.event = function() {
      result.hasRun = true;
      result.result = true; // or something else...
   };
   return promise;
}

// check if it has run and get the result:

if (promise.hasRun) {
  // access promise.result
}

But, a simple callback should suffice. Since you mentioned the XMLHttpRequest object, you should be able to attach a callback to its onreadystatechange event, or pass a callback to aFunc:

function aFunc(callback) {
   object.event = function() {
      var result = true;
      callback(result);
   };
}

Then your callback gets called with the result at the time it is available.

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The closure does run, the object and event in question is an xmlhttp ready state, maybe my example has confused things. –  Lee Aug 27 '12 at 15:01
    
Then it's a timing issue, it definitely doesn't run before you return its result. What you need then, is to return a promise, something you can check later; or simply use a callback. –  Jordão Aug 27 '12 at 15:04
    
Ah I see. What would a promise look like? –  Lee Aug 27 '12 at 15:05
    
Updated with more ideas.... –  Jordão Aug 27 '12 at 15:10
    
Thanks, I ended up using my own call back, which works a treat :) –  Lee Aug 27 '12 at 15:42
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You could pass an object to the closure, whose attribute 'result' it would set when the function is called.

function aFunc (foo) {
    object.event = function() {
        foo.result = true;
    }
}

The problem is that the value of result is returned by aFunc, rather than a reference to it, which means that any subsequent change of result that happens inside the closure would not affect the result that was returned earlier.

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The example above is a simplification of the function I'm having trouble with. Result is determined within the closure(?) and depending on several conditions may or may not be true. So I couldn't pass a predetermined value for result into it. –  Lee Aug 27 '12 at 14:59
    
Doesn't matter. The point is that you assign to an attribute of a known object and will have access to the result. –  Qnan Aug 27 '12 at 14:59
    
If you assign to a local variable result within the function aFunc after aFunc has finished executing, you have little chance of retrieving the value –  Qnan Aug 27 '12 at 15:00
    
Passing an object seems like the simplest idea, but would this work given the timing issue? –  Lee Aug 27 '12 at 15:11
    
Well, it will assign the necessary value to the field 'result' of 'foo' when the closure is executed. You have to store the object till then. –  Qnan Aug 27 '12 at 15:13
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This isn't possible; the code

object.event = function(){
    result = true;
}

doesn't actually execute result = true;, it just defines a function which would set result to true. Using result before calling the function would yield an undefined value.

There are two solutions:

  1. You can use a container (as suggested by Qnan)

  2. You can use callbacks.

The second approach means: Instead of using result right away, you let the function behind object.event call some code of you as soon as result has some useful value:

object.event = function(){
    result = true;
    callback(result);
}
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That makes sense. I'm familiar with callbacks after using them in C#. Thanks. –  Lee Aug 27 '12 at 15:06
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