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I'm learning floating-point addition and I'm rather confused at one part. The example I'm working with goes like this:

(Assume 8 bit machine, exponent excess-3)

x = 6.75 = 01011011
y = -10 = 11100100

Denormalise and use same exponents gives:

x = 1.1011 x 2^2 = 0.1101 x 2^3
y = -1.0100 x 2^3

Add/subtract the mantissas gives:

01101 + -10100 = -00111

I don't quite get how 01101 + -10100 = -00111. Can someone explain this to me please?

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3 Answers 3

First, scaling 1.1011•22 should give 0.11011•23, not 0.1101•23. It is an error to discard bits early.

However, given the way it is, we want to calculate 01101 + -10100. Put the larger number above the smaller number and remember that, because the larger number is negative, the result must be negative:

1 0 1 0 0
0 1 1 0 1
_________

Now subtract the elementary-school way. On the right, we subtract 1 from 0. This requires borrowing from the digit to the left, so we subtract 1 from 10 (0 plus the borrowed value) and mark the borrow:

1 0 1 0'0
0 1 1 0 1
_________
        1

Now we subtract 0 from -1 (0 minus the borrow). This requires borrowing again, so we subtract 0 from 1 (0 minus the borrow of 1 plus the new borrow of 10):

1 0 1'0'0
0 1 1 0 1
_________
      1 1

Then 1 from 0 (1 minus the borrowed 1). We borrow again, so we subtract 1 from 10:

1 0'1'0'0
0 1 1 0 1
_________
    1 1 1

Then 1 from -1 (0 minus the borrowed 1). We borrow again, so we subtract 1 from 1 (0 minus the borrowed 1 plus the newly borrowed 10):

1'0'1'0'0
0 1 1 0 1
_________
  0 1 1 1

Then 0 from 0 (1 minus the borrowed 1). Finally, there is no new borrow, and we have:

1'0'1'0'0
0 1 1 0 1
_________
0 0 1 1 1

We remember this is negative, so the result is -00111.

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Just had to do better than me :P Props, and an upvote :) –  jaypb Aug 27 '12 at 17:52
    
Thanks a lot for the explanation! It was confusing because I hadn't really done any binary subtraction, only addition so it was confusing trying to work backwards on something I wasn't so familiar with. While I'm on that subject though, is it possible to somehow convert it to a standard addition? Like the method used to add a negative 2's complement number? –  REMAG Joe Aug 27 '12 at 18:11
    
To work with two’s complement: For each operand: Put an extra bit on the left to be a sign bit. If the operand is negative, invert each bit and add one. (This converts it to two’s complement.) Add the numbers using two’s complement arithmetic. If the sign bit of the result is set, subtract one, invert each bit, and mark the result negative. (This converts two’s complement back to sign and magnitude.) –  Eric Postpischil Aug 27 '12 at 19:24

The simplest way to explain it would be to convert them to decimal.

+01101 (base 2) = +13 (base 10)
-10100 (base 2) = -20 (base 10)

-20 + 13 = -7

-7 (base 10) = -00111 (base 2)
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Firstly, when I am stuck doing simple math in non decimal bases I find it can be occasionally useful to convert back into decimal to see what is going on.

So, firstly, adding the numbers gives us

6.75 - 10.0 = -3.25

Or in binary, not worrying about exponents too much because they are the same power

01101 - 10100 = -00111

Best way to perform this operation manually is to find the result of

 10100
-01101

Using normal addition rules, and then invert the result. Briefly:

Borrow from the left most 1 in order to perform subtraction:

 02100
-01101
 _____
 00111

And due to the 1 in the rightmost bottom column, we need to borrow again, similar to performing in decimal.

Now, let's double check what this result actually is:

-0.0111_2 * 2 ^ 3

Is actually -3.5! The reason why this is so is the loss of accuracy resulting from treating 1.1011 x 2^2 as 0.1101 x 2^3 instead of its actual value, .11011 x 2^3.

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