Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A nondeterministic machine trying to decide membership in a language is presented with a hint (called a "witness" or "certificate") which proves membership (no such witness is provided for elements outside the language; the definition is asymmetric).

So, if a non-deterministic algorithm can solve a problem in O(f(n)) time, does this mean the length of the certificate is f(n)? And the input size is n?

Also, if an algorithm A exists that can verify a certificate in O(f(n)) time, how does this imply the existence of a non-deterministic algorithm that can solve the problem in O(f(n)) time?

share|improve this question
    
StackOverflow is probably not the right place for this question. cstheory.stackexchange.com seems a better fit. –  hatchet Aug 27 '12 at 19:25
    
Cross posted there, thanks! –  Ingrid Morstrad Sep 10 '12 at 8:13

1 Answer 1

IMHO:

  • So, if a non-deterministic algorithm can solve a problem in O(f(n)) time, does this mean the length of the certificate is f(n)?

no

  • And the input size is n?

yes

  • Also, if an algorithm A exists that can verify a certificate in O(f(n)) time, how does this imply the existence of a non-deterministic algorithm that can solve the problem in O(f(n)) time?

No implication here. The statement is that if a non-deterministic algorithm can solve a problem in O(f(n)) and the solution (certificate or whitness if you want) can be verified in O(g(n)) and f and g are polynoms, than the problem is NP hard. (not necessarily NP-complete)

share|improve this answer
    
I've been given that it directly implies the latter. Would your answer change if A was a deterministic algorithm? –  Ingrid Morstrad Sep 10 '12 at 8:12
    
Also, shouldn't it imply that the certificate size is f(n) since a non-deterministic (luckiest guesser) algorithm would be able to solve it in a minimum the length of the solution by guessing every bit correctly? –  Ingrid Morstrad Sep 10 '12 at 8:12
    
I understand that the length of the certificate will be O(f(n)) :) –  Ingrid Morstrad Sep 10 '12 at 13:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.