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When I call sizeToFit on one of my views, I noticed that the iOS framework first calls sizeThatFits and then layoutSubviews on that view. This is problematic for me because the calculation in my sizeThatFits depends on the results of my layoutSubviews. In the following example, a subview gets adjusted in layoutSubviews and this subview's height is used in sizeThatFits. Currently my code is not working the order is reversed.

In my view controller's viewDidLoad:

UIView* header = [[MyHeader alloc] init];
[header sizeToFit];
self.tableView.tableHeaderView = header;
[header release];

In my view:

- (void) layoutSubviews {
    [super layoutSubviews];
    [self.subView sizeToFit];
}

- (CGSize) sizeThatFits:(CGSize)size {
    return CGSizeMake(
        self.frame.size.width,
        self.subView.frame.size.height
    );
}
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Did you ever resolve this issue? –  Stian Høiland Sep 23 '13 at 14:48
    
In your first code you call [header sizeToFit] which does nothing it MyHeader's sizeThatFits: is not overridden: > The default implementation of this method returns the size portion of the view’s bounds rectangle. –  Rivera Oct 21 '13 at 7:38
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5 Answers

You would want your view to always do The Right Thing(tm), no matter in which order you call things. To accomplish that, I would suggest putting your code that calculates the desired height for your view and the subviews in a separate method. Something along these lines:

- (void)updateSubviewDimensions
{
    [self.subview sizeToFit];
    // possibly much more code
}

- (void) layoutSubviews {
    [super layoutSubviews];
    [self updateSubviewDimensions];
}

- (CGSize) sizeThatFits:(CGSize)size {
    [self updateSubviewDimensions];
    return CGSizeMake(
        self.frame.size.width,
        self.subView.frame.size.height
    );
}

This way, you are not dependent on remembering to call a certain method before calling sizeToFit, but your view will always do what you want. Plus, your code is less brittle and easier to understand when you look at it a few months from now (or have a different developer look at it).

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If your sizeThatFits: requires layout to be accurate then you need to force a layout (see code below.) But I think this is poorly designed because your layout isn't taking the "size" into account.

- (CGSize) sizeThatFits:(CGSize)size {

    [self setNeedsLayout];
    [self layoutIfNeeded];

    return CGSizeMake(
        self.frame.size.width,
        self.subView.frame.size.height
    );
}

A better approach might be to use auto layout for your subviews, then use systemLayoutSizeFittingSize: to determine the required size of your view (vs. sizeThatFits:)

If you can't or don't want to use auto layout then you should consider having separate code paths for actual layout and layout calculation.

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Can't you just change the frame of the subview in the -layoutSubviews method instead of the -sizeThatFits: method?

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Have you tried calling layoutIfNeeded on the view to force layoutSubviews? Despite the misleading name, this is the way to immediately trigger layoutSubviews. Try calling this before sizeToFit or sizeThatFits.

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The problem here is that the subviews don't have dimensions until after layoutSubviews is called. This is the same as in a custom table view cell.

To get around this you need to either change the logic around or do the maths yourself to get an explicit dimension without relying on automatic stuff.

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