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I recently gave an phone interview.It involved coding of a problem as part of the process.
The problem was a variation of the Find the most closest common ancestor of a tree but with a twist. The tree was much graph-like i.e. child nodes could be connected. Example:

     A   
   /  
  B 
  | \ 
  C  E  
  |  |  
  D  F  
  \  /  
   G   

In this case given this tree and the nodes F and D the resulting closest common ansestor would be B. The second twist was that the tree was presented as an array. The method to implement had the following input:
public String getCA(String[] nodes, String[][] parentNodes, String targetNode1, String targetNode2)
In this example nodes = {"G", "F", "E", "D", "C", "B", "A"} and parentNodes = {{"F","D"},{"E"}, {"B"}, {"C"}, {"B"}, {"A"}, null}
Essentially for nodes[i] the parent(s) is parentNodes[i].
To be honest I panicked completely (was already pretty nervous) and took me really really long time to figure out an answer.
Although I think this is solved recursively I somehow came up with an iterative solution which as far as I can tell works:I push nodes in queue and go up the path first for the first target node and then the second node. Once I find an already encountered node I consider it as the solution (have added comments to clear things up).

public String getCA(String[] nodes, String[][] parentNodes, String targetNode1, String targetNode2) {  
        if(nodes == null || parentNodes == null){  
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();  
        }  

        Map<String, String[]> map = new HashMap<String, String[]>();  
        for(int i = 0; i < nodes.length; i++){  
            map.put(nodes[i], parentNodes[i]);  
        }  
        //These are the parents visited as we go up  
        Set<String> parentsSeen = new HashSet<String>();  
        parentsSeen.add(targetNode1);  

        Queue<String> path = new LinkedList<String>();  
        String[] parents = map.get(targetNode1);  
        //The root is the common parent  
        if(parents == null){  
            return targetNode1;  
        }   

        //Build the path up  
        for(String parent:parents){  
            path.add(parent);  
        }  
        while(!path.isEmpty()){  
            String currentParent = path.remove();  
            parentsSeen.add(currentParent);  
            parents = map.get(currentParent);  
            if(parents == null){  
                continue;   
            }  
            for(String parent:parents){  
                path.add(parent);  
            }  
        }  

        parents = map.get(targetNode2);  
        //It is the root, so it is the common parent  
        if(parents == null){  
            return targetNode2;  
        }  
        //Start going up for the targetNode2. The first parent that we have already visited is the common parent  
        for(String parent:parents){  
            if(parentsSeen.contains(parent)){  
                return parent;  
            }  
            path.add(parent);  
        }  

        while(!path.isEmpty()){  
            String currentParent = path.remove();  
            if(parentsSeen.contains(currentParent)){  
                return currentParent;  
            }             
            parents = map.get(currentParent);  
            if(parents == null){  
                continue;  
            }  
            for(String parent:parents){  
                path.add(parent);  
            }  
        }  
        return null;            
    }

I did not get a move forward call. Now due to the fact that I am "self-taught" I would be interested to understand how I messed up here. Due to the fact that this is technical issue, I believe it is not subjective matter and hopefully I could get help here from experienced people.
So as collegue programmers how would you handle the problem and how do you evaluate my solution? What do I need to do to improve my skills?
You can be as straightforward as you possible. As long as I can understand what went wrong and learn I am satisfied

share|improve this question
    
@Tudor:It seemed correct to me.Perhaps you should let the answer for a reference on recurrence example. –  Cratylus Aug 27 '12 at 20:59
    
Actually it wasn't that good. It was giving you all the paths upwards, but from there it was hard to find the common one. I developed another solution using BFS, but at the end I noticed its almost identical to yours, except maybe a bit more structured. So good job I guess. :) –  Tudor Aug 27 '12 at 21:08
    
@Tudor:Good job?But I didn't get even a personal interview...I guess this is black humor ;) –  Cratylus Aug 27 '12 at 21:12
    
One difference I did notice is that I was using LinkedHashSet which conserves the insertion order of the nodes, so you could just go from left to right and find the first match. Anyway, there could be many other reasons why the interview was not a success... –  Tudor Aug 27 '12 at 21:12

7 Answers 7

It's not even clear to me what "most closest" means here. Consider the following graph:

    I
   /\
  /  \
 /    \
H      E
|\    /|
| \  / |
G  \/  D
|  /\  |
| /  F C
|/    \|
A      B

Here there are 2 common ancestors of A and B, H and E. H is distance 2 from both A and B. E is distance 1 from A but distance 3 from B. Which do I choose?

Furthermore, no matter what your answer to that question, finding the set of ancestors from one and then doing a BFS from the other doesn't work. Finding all the ancestors of A and then doing a BFS from B finds H first, and finding all the ancestors of B and then doing a BFS from A finds E first. As an adversary, I can switch A and B to make your algorithm fail with respect to whatever choice you make (the choice of whether 2/2 or 1/3 is better).

So the correct algorithm must be more complicated than just an ancestor set calculation plus a BFS. And unless you tell me how to make that choice, I'm not sure I can pin down a correct algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
But what node is the root here?Because the question was not about a graph but a tree with the "twist" of connected children.The root was 1 node –  Cratylus Aug 28 '12 at 15:59
    
@Cratylus: Just add a common ancestor to H and E. –  Keith Randall Aug 28 '12 at 16:59
    
From your drawing it seems to me that the closest common ancestor of A and B is X.Why are you saying it is H and E? –  Cratylus Aug 28 '12 at 20:14
    
@Cratylus: Sorry, X is just a line crossing, it isn't a node. Stupid ASCII art... –  Keith Randall Aug 28 '12 at 20:59
    
I've fixed up the diagram. –  Keith Randall Aug 28 '12 at 21:24

Very nice question, you really put effort into writing this. I'm sorry about the interview, I know it must be really frustrating when things like this happen. Let's see about the problem.

An idea that comes to mind is this: you can go recursively upwards until you reach the root from both target nodes and build two lists. At the end, simply find the first common node in both lists.

public static List<String> visitUpwards(Map<String, String[]> mapping, String current) {
    List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();
    list.add(current);
    if(mapping.get(current) == null) return list;
    else {           
       for(String s: mapping.get(current)) {              
          list.addAll(visitUpwards(mapping, s));                            
       }
       return list;
    }
}  

Edit: On second thought, this was not a very good idea, since it basically does a DFS search upwards, making finding the first common ancestor difficult. A better idea is to run a BFS for each target instead (this may seem similar to your solution :D):

public static Set<String> BFS(Map<String, String[]> mapping, String node) {
    Queue<String> queue = new LinkedList<String>();
    Set<String> result = new LinkedHashSet<String>();
    queue.add(node);
    while(!queue.isEmpty()) {
        String current = queue.remove();
        result.add(current);
        if(mapping.get(current) != null)
            for(String s: mapping.get(current)) {
                queue.add(s);
            }
    }
    return result;
}

Then use another map to find the first common ancestor:

Set<String> list1 = BFS(mapping, "D");      
Set<String> list2 = BFS(mapping, "G");
System.out.println(list1);
System.out.println(list2);

Map<String, Boolean> src = new HashMap<String, Boolean>();

for(String s: list1) {
    src.put(s, true);
}

for(String s: list2) {
    if(src.get(s) != null && src.get(s)) {
        System.out.println(s);
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Ah, break it into 2 separate recursive methods.Somehow my mind was "glued" to thinking how to recurse on the given method and could not think this out –  Cratylus Aug 27 '12 at 20:27
    
@Cratylus: I've made a slight correction to the code to return the nodes in reverse order (i.e. from the target up to the root). –  Tudor Aug 27 '12 at 20:34
    
@Cratylus: I've found a better solution. Check the edit. It is very similar to your solution, although I preferred to use two BFS searches and then compare the lists. It seems easier to understand. –  Tudor Aug 27 '12 at 21:03
1  
@Cratylus: I decided to let this undeleted in the end, simply because it seems a bit more clear to me what is going on and using LinkedHashSet makes searching for the common ancestor easier than what I saw in your code. –  Tudor Aug 28 '12 at 5:45

I can't tell you why the company didn't call you back. But your code would benefit greatly by extracting code into smaller, meaningful methods, rather than using a single, big method with all that detailed, low-level logic. And although I haven't gone so far as to try compiling your code and running it on some test cases, just from a quick reading, I'm not at all convinced that the code is correct. It's possible that the closest comment ancestor could be targetNode1 or targetNode2 (say if targetNode2 was the parent of targetNode1). (I guess this depends on the details of how you define "closest common ancestor" -- you should have clarified what it means in that case.)

  • Using a map from node to parents is a good idea. But you can extract the code which builds that map into a small method, with a meaningful name.
  • You can define a method which implements a breadth-first search through a graph (which is essentially what you are doing here). Use that same method on targetNode1 and targetNode2.
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Yes good points!And looking now that you mention it I do parentsSeen.add(targetNode1); to cover the case of targetNode1 being the parent but I don't do that for targetNode2 –  Cratylus Aug 27 '12 at 20:14
    
@Cratylus, BTW, if you are looking for work as a programmer, you can always pick up some jobs through an online job posting site like oDesk. I have been freelancing for clients located through oDesk for a year now and it has worked out great. Getting the first job is the hardest, but after that it gets easier and easier (assuming you complete jobs successfully). –  Alex D Aug 28 '12 at 15:58
    
:I did not know about this.Thank you very much for the tip!I will check it out! –  Cratylus Aug 28 '12 at 16:05

A more optimal solution could be to use an array of booleans for bookkeeping. One for each node. Init them all to false. Set them to true when you visit a node. Alternate your way upward the "tree" just as you're doing today. Once you come to an already visited node (set to true in the array) then you found the common ancestor.

EDIT: A better approach would be to have an array of integers with a unique identifier for each origin node. If there are loops we need to know who has already visited the node, it might be ourselves.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I associate a node with an index of the boolean array? –  Cratylus Aug 27 '12 at 20:11
    
They already have an index from the given array; use that. This approach fails though if there are cycles. –  sshannin Aug 27 '12 at 20:21
    
Yes, if there are cycles you have to have a unique identifier for each of the origin nodes. Use an integer instead. –  Jens Agby Aug 27 '12 at 20:24
    
Just use a Set :-) –  oldrinb Aug 27 '12 at 20:31

Consider the following variation of your graph...

              A
              |
          X---B---Y
           \ / \ /
            C   E  
            |   |
            D   F
             \ /
              G

nodes = {"G", "F", "E", "D", "C", "B", "A", "X", "Y"}

parentNodes = {{"F","D"},{"E"}, {"Y","B"}, {"C"}, {"X","B"}, {"A"}, null, {"B"}, {"B"}}

I think your program would run into difficulity when it hits node "C" because it has two parent nodes to explore. You either need to resort to a recursive algorithm or manage some sort of a stack for unexplored nodes using an iterative algorithm.

Since you appear to have a bias toward iteraton you could try something similar to this:

Create an array (or similar data structure). Each array element holds three pieces of information:

 nodeName: string - name of a node from your `nodes` string
 pathLength[2]: integer -  array of minimum path length from refrence node (1 or 2).

Create stack. Each stack element contans three pieces of information:

 nodeName: string - name of a node to "explore"
 lengthToHere: integer - length of path from reference node to `nodeName`
 pathNumber: integer - 1 for first reference node, 2 for second.

Algorithm:

 Initialize array with nodeName from nodes and set each pathLength to "infinity"
 Push both starting reference nodes onto the stack: 

       push("F", 0, 1)
       push "D", 0, 2)

Repeat until stack is empty:
  - pop(nodeName, lengthToHere, pathNumber)
  - update pathLength[pathNumber] of element having nodeName in array with minimum of
            its current value and lengthToHere
  - for each parent of nodeName push(parent, lengthToHere + 1, pathNumber)

The stack is empty once all paths from starting reference nodes have been evaluated. If there is a common ancestor both pathLength values for a given nodeName will be less than infinity. Add these values together giving the total path length to this common ancestor. Report the nodeName with the smallest sum.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you give an example of two nodes where you think the OP's algorithm would fail on this graph? –  Tudor Aug 28 '12 at 5:20
    
@tudor If there is more than one common ancestor, and starting from targetNode1 to ancestor "X" is a short path but from targetNode2 it is a very long path you can have a situation where "X" might be choosen over a different common ancestor, "Y", where the path from targetNode1 is slightly longer than for "X" but from targetNode2 the path is much shorter than for "X". In this situation I would tend to choose "Y" as the closest common ancestor. The OP's program would choose "X" based on the shortest path from one, but not both starting nodes. –  NealB Aug 28 '12 at 12:11
    
@NealB:But the ancestors are put in a Queue, so if a node has more than 1 parents all we be placed in the queue and as I remove from Queue I deal with this one.It should be the part while(!path.isEmpty()){ String currentParent = path.remove(); that does this.Are you saying that this part is erroneous in your test example? –  Cratylus Aug 28 '12 at 16:08
    
@Cratylus Sorry, the first part of my answer is "off track". You are correct using a queue (or stack) will get you through all paths from a given stating node (the only difference here is BFS vs DFS). However, the "closest common ancestor" is still a problem if "closest" means combined path length from both starting nodes to a common node. That is why I added the bit about maintaining the pathLength from each starting node to common nodes and looking for the minumum sum. If "closest" means shortest path from targetNode1 only, then your original approach is as good as any. –  NealB Aug 28 '12 at 16:40

For a given target nodes x and y do the following:

  • Add x and all its ancestors to the set S.
  • Check if y is in S, if not then check if the parents of y are in S, if not then check if their parents are in S, and so on.

The running time is O(n).

share|improve this answer
1  
How is this different from what I am doing? –  Cratylus Aug 28 '12 at 16:02
    
If it's what your doing then what is wrong with an algorithm that runs in O(n) and solves a very NOT trivial problem in this strange but interesting question? Note that it is not really a tree since a node can have more than one parent and also all the standard algorithms that solve similar questions in directed graphs do not apply to this question. –  Avi Cohen Aug 28 '12 at 17:05

I may have misunderstood something but I think this part of your algorithm may waste a lot of time researching nodes:

   while(!path.isEmpty()){  
        String currentParent = path.remove();  
        parentsSeen.add(currentParent);  
        parents = map.get(currentParent);  
        if(parents == null){  
            continue;   
        }  
        for(String parent:parents){  
            path.add(parent);  
        }  
    }  

This looks like a breadth first search of the tree but you may end up searching the same nodes multiple times due to a child having multiple parents.

You could stop the wasted time by adding a check of your parentsSeen set:

    while(!path.isEmpty()){  
        String currentParent = path.remove();  
        if (parentsSeen.contains(currentParent)) {
            continue;
        }
        parentsSeen.add(currentParent);  
        parents = map.get(currentParent);  
        if(parents == null){  
            continue;   
        }  
        for(String parent:parents){  
            path.add(parent);  
        }  
    }  
share|improve this answer

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