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Update: this issue was a result of jQuery 1.7 vs 1.8. Do not ever use promises in 1.7 beacuse they aren't chainable with returning a promise inside a .then. 1.8 looks like they didn't mess it up.

http://jsfiddle.net/delvarworld/28TDM/

// make a promise
var deferred = $.Deferred();
promise = deferred.promise();

// return a promise, that after 1 second, is rejected
promise.then(function(){
    var t = $.Deferred();
    setTimeout(function() {
        console.log('rejecting...');
        t.reject();
    }, 1000);

    return t.promise();
});

// if that promise is successful, do this
promise.then(function() {
    console.log('i should never be called');
})

// if it errors, do this
promise.fail(function() {
    console.log('i should be called');
});

deferred.resolve();

Expected: 'i should be called'

Actual: 'i should never be called'

Problem: I want to chain callbacks and have any one of them be able to break the chain and trigger the fail function, and skip the other chained callbacks. I don't understand why all of the thens are triggered and the fail is not triggered.

I'm coming from NodeJS's Q library, so I tried it with .then first. However, changing it to .pipe has no effect.

share|improve this question
    
Returning t from .then() doesn't do anything. Rejecting t also doesn't affect the original deferred object in any way. Callbacks from .then aren't called until after the deferred object they are applied to are either resolved or rejected. Once they are resolved or rejected, they can't be rejected or resolved again. –  Kevin B Aug 27 '12 at 21:44
    
To make this easier to understand, replace .then with .done since in your case they do exactly the same thing. –  Kevin B Aug 27 '12 at 21:46
    
At least in Q, I believe, returning a promise inside of then adds it to the chain. what's the correct way to chain otherwise? –  Andy Ray Aug 27 '12 at 21:47
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You aren't re-defining the value of promise, try this:

http://jsfiddle.net/28TDM/1/

var deferred = $.Deferred();
promise = deferred.promise();

promise = promise.then(function(){
    var t = $.Deferred();
    setTimeout(function() {
        console.log('rejecting...');
        t.reject();
    }, 1000);

    return t.promise();
});

promise.then(function() {
    console.log('i should never be called');
})

promise.fail(function() {
    console.log('i should be called');
});

deferred.resolve();

Apparently it does work the way you thought it did, it just isn't documented. Very cool. This is new functionality added in jQuery 1.8.0, more than likely they just aren't done updating the documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
i'm still having an issue with this flow but having trouble making a generalized jsfiddle for it. i'm wondering if this fiddle is just working from coincidence. –  Andy Ray Aug 28 '12 at 0:05
    
@AndyRay If it helps any, this is the change that made my fiddle work: bugs.jquery.com/ticket/11010 –  Kevin B Aug 28 '12 at 5:37
    
Also, if you use .pipe in place of .then it will also work. jsfiddle.net/28TDM/2 Then, if you chain it rather than going back to the promise variable, you don't have to re-define promise. jsfiddle.net/28TDM/3 –  Kevin B Aug 28 '12 at 6:01
    
UPDATE: I have found the actual issue. We were using jQuery 1.7. Promises in 1.7 are broken and awful. They are fixed in 1.8 and it looks like pipe is deprecated, thank god. –  Andy Ray Sep 21 '12 at 23:06
1  
haa opss sorry, my brain read it as "I should never be called". sorry again. excellent work! –  vsync Apr 2 at 18:15
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