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I have the following example code and let's say that MyCallable("B") takes longer than one second to execute, when the others execute quicker than one second. Therefore inside my loop that calls Future.get(), it will throw a TimeoutException.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ExecutorService es = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(2);

    List<Future<String>> futures = new ArrayList<Future<String>>();

    futures.add(es.submit(new MyCallable("A")));
    futures.add(es.submit(new MyCallable("B")));
    futures.add(es.submit(new MyCallable("C")));
    futures.add(es.submit(new MyCallable("D")));
    futures.add(es.submit(new MyCallable("E")));

    try {
        for(Future<String> f  : futures) {
            try {
                System.out.println("result " + f.get(1, TimeUnit.SECONDS));
            }
            catch (TimeoutException e) {
                // how do I know which MyCallable() has timed out?
            } catch (ExecutionException e) {
                System.out.println(e.getMessage());
            }
        }
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    finally {
        es.shutdown();
    }
}

As expected each of the MyCallable() instances execute, but for the one that times out I would like to perform some error handling and this requires knowing which Callable is associated with which Future.

Is there a mechanism for this association or is it up to my Callable to handle all the error processing inside it's call() method?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seems like you could simply maintain a Map<Future<String>, Callable<String>> instead of a List<Future<String>> and retrieve the original Callable that way.

If you want to get really clever, you could do it OO-style and extend ThreadPoolExecutor and create a Future decorator class. I think this is probably overkill, but you could do it like this:

import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeoutException;


public class FutureWithCallable<T> implements Future<T> {
    private final Callable<T> callable;
    private final Future<T> wrapped;

    public FutureWithCallable(Future<T> wrapped, Callable<T> callable) {
        this.callable = callable;
        this.wrapped = wrapped;
    }

    public Callable<T> getCallable() {
        return callable;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean cancel(boolean mayInterruptIfRunning) {
        return wrapped.cancel(mayInterruptIfRunning);
    }

    @Override
    public T get() throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
        return wrapped.get();
    }

    @Override
    public T get(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) throws InterruptedException,
            ExecutionException, TimeoutException {
        return wrapped.get(timeout, unit);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isCancelled() {
        return wrapped.isCancelled();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isDone() {
        return wrapped.isDone();
    }
}

And then:

import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

    public class ExecutorServiceWithCallable extends ThreadPoolExecutor {

        public ExecutorServiceWithCallable(int corePoolSize, int maxPoolSize, long keepAliveTime, TimeUnit unit, BlockingQueue<Runnable> workQueue) {
            super(corePoolSize, maxPoolSize, keepAliveTime, unit, workQueue);
        }

        @Override
        public <T> FutureWithCallable submit(Callable<T> callable) {
            Future<T> future = super.submit(callable);
            return new FutureWithCallable<T>(future, callable);
        }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
Using Map<Future<String>, Callable<String>> is the simplest option and works – Brad Nov 25 '15 at 20:48

public class TimeoutException extends Exception Exception thrown when a blocking operation times out. Blocking operations for which a timeout is specified need a means to indicate that the timeout has occurred. For many such operations it is possible to return a value that indicates timeout; when that is not possible or desirable then TimeoutException should be declared and thrown.

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