Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Just wondering if there is any code in batch file that can find a certain text or word in a .txt file.

For Example:

  1. The quick brown fox jump \mark{1} over the lazy dog
  2. The quick \mark{10} brown fox jump over the lazy dog
  3. The quick brown fox jump over the lazy \mark{100} dog
  4. The quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog \mark{1000}
  5. The \mark{1} quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog
  6. The quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog \mark{100}
  7. The quick brown fox \mark{30} jump over the lazy dog

as you can see from the example above, I want to search for the "\mark{Number here}" word and also if there is any possibility that when there is an occurrence of the same word for example the first line and the fifth line, it will only display the "\mark{1}" of the first line and disregard the same word in the fifth line

so the results will be printed in a txt file will be:

  1. \mark{1}
  2. \mark{10}
  3. \mark{100}
  4. \mark{1000}
  5. \mark{30}
share|improve this question
1  
you have to use REGEX for this -- do you have powershell installed? –  TheHe Aug 27 '12 at 23:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should be relatively easy if you download a tool like sed for Windows (or perhaps grep for Windows). The Gnu project has both sed and grep for Windows for free.

It should also be relatively easy using regex capabilities of VBScript, JScript, or powershell.

But I thought I would take a stab at using native batch. FINDSTR has primitive regex support, but it cannot extract the matching text, so the batch solution is fairly complex.

The solution below can find multiple marks on one line. It is also able to count the number of appearances for each distinct mark. The SET search and replace is case insensitive, so I was forced to make this entire solution case insensitive.

The solution can only handle lines of length ~8191 bytes or less.

The performance should be good even for very large files as long as the number of lines containing marks is relatively small.

@echo off
setlocal disableDelayedExpansion
set "file=test.txt"
set LF=^


::The two blank lines above are critical to create linefeed - do not remove.

::Clear any existing \mark variables
for /f "delims==" %%A in ('2^>nul set \mark{') do set "%%A="

::Find all lines that contain at least one valid mark and call a routine
::to parse out all marks
for /f eol^=^%LF%%LF%delims^= %%A in (
  'findstr /ri \mark{[0-9][0-9]*} "%file%"'
) do (
  set "ln=%%A"
  call :parseMarks
)

::Create file containing found marks only
>marks.txt (
  for /f "delims==" %%A in ('set \mark{') do echo %%A
)

::Create file containing found marks with counts
>markCounts.txt set \mark{

::Print the results
echo Here is a list of found marks
echo -----------------------------
type marks.txt
echo(
echo Here is a list of found marks with the counts
echo ---------------------------------------------
type markCounts.txt

exit /b

:parseMarks
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
set "ln2=!ln:*\mark{=!"
if !ln2! neq !ln! (
  for /f "tokens=1* delims=}" %%B in ("x!ln2!x") do (
    endlocal
    echo(%%B|findstr /xr x[0-9][0-9]* >nul && (
      for /f "delims=x" %%D in ("%%B") do set /a \mark{%%D}+=1
    )
    set "ln=%%C"
  )
  if defined ln goto :parseMarks
)
exit /b

Here is the test.txt file that I used. It has a number of problem test cases that make a batch solution difficult.

The \mark{} quick brown fox jump \mark{1} over the lazy dog
The quick \mark{10} brown fox jump over the \mark{99a} lazy dog
The quick \mark{}99} brown fox jump over the lazy \mark{100} dog! \MARK{22}!
The quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog \mark{1000} \mark{99
;The \mark{1} quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog
The \mark{!!99} quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog \mark{100}
\mark{22}The quick brown fox \mark{30} jump over the lazy dog
exclude \mark{100a}
exclude \mark{}
include \MARK{22}

And here are my results

Here is a list of found marks
-----------------------------
\mark{1000}
\mark{100}
\mark{10}
\mark{1}
\mark{22}
\mark{30}

Here is a list of found marks with the counts
---------------------------------------------
\mark{1000}=1
\mark{100}=2
\mark{10}=1
\mark{1}=2
\mark{22}=3
\mark{30}=1
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, just wanna say thanks alot it really solved my problem. much gratitude and respect. now i can do my work faster than just manually searching for this words. Once again thanks alot. –  Life's A Joke Aug 28 '12 at 14:55
    
@Life'sAJoke - If you feel your question has been answered then you should accept the answer by clicking on the check mark near the upper left corner of the answer. That action lets others know the question has been answered, it awards you 2 reputation points, and awards the answer poster 15 points. Only one answer can be accepted. Once you reach 15 points you can up vote as many answers as you find useful, including answers to other people's questions. Each up vote awards 10 points to the answer poster, but nothing to you the voter. –  dbenham Aug 28 '12 at 15:00

If you would like to do it without non-microsoft utilities, you can use this method:

NOTE: This method uses the strlen.bat routine from dostips.com which is available HERE

@echo off
setlocal enabledelayedexpansion
for /f "tokens=*" %%x in (findOnce.txt) do call :work "%%x"
echo #%linenum% lines.
endlocal
goto :eof

:work
set line=%~1
if not "!line:\mark{=!"=="!line!" (
  call strlen line len
  for /l %%y in (0,1,!len!) do (
    if "!line:~%%y,1!"=="\" (
      set clip= \
    ) else (
      if "!clip!" neq "" ( 
        set clip=!clip!!line:~%%y,1!
        if "!line:~%%y,1!"=="}" (
          call :getcheck "!markset!" "!clip!"
          if "!markset!"=="" (
            set /a linenum=!linenum! + 1
            set markset=!markset!!clip!
            echo !linenum! !clip!
            set clip=
          ) else if "!check!"=="!markset!" (
            set /a linenum=!linenum! + 1
            set markset=!markset!!clip!
            echo !linenum! !clip!
            set clip=
          )
        )
      )
    )
  )
)
goto :eof

:getcheck
  set markset=%~1
  set clip=%~2
  call set check=%%markset:!clip!=%%
  if  "!check:~-1!"=="=" set check=!check:~,-1!
  if "!check:~1,1!"==" " set check=!check,~1!
goto :eof
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.