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This is a different question than the other one I've posted, I have this piece of code:

class Base
{
public:
    Base()
    {

    };


    virtual void Method()
    {
        cout << "Base Method";
    }
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
    virtual void Method()
    {
        cout << "Override Method";
    }
};


class Derived2 : public Derived
{
public:

    Derived2()
    {

        cout << "Derived2 constructor";
    }
    void Method()
    {
        cout << "Override2 Method";
    }
};

int main()
{

    Base *myPointer = new Derived();

    dynamic_cast<Derived2*>(myPointer)->Derived2::Method();

    Sleep(700);

    delete myPointer;

    return 0;
}

If I write

dynamic_cast<Derived2*>(myPointer)->Method();

there's a failure (dynamic_cast returns NULL and NULL->Method() provokes an exception) and this is what I was expecting, but if I write

dynamic_cast<Derived2*>(myPointer)->Derived2::Method();

the function succeeds without even calling the Derived2 constructor. Method isn't even a static function, what is going on here?

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3  
Unrelated to your question but using delete on a pointer to Base which actually points to an object with dynamic type Derived is UB since Base doesn't have a virtual destructor. This can be avoided by not using new/delete altogether: use a Derived variable, and then have a pointer (or reference) to Base point to (refer to) it. It doesn't hurt to make the destructor virtual though. –  Luc Danton Aug 27 '12 at 23:44
    
Undefined behavior. Add a member to Derived2 and attempt to access it inside Derived2::Method. –  oldrinb Aug 28 '12 at 0:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You triggered undefined behavior by calling a member function on a NULL pointer. If you use dynamic_cast, you must either check the returned pointer for NULL before dereferencing it or 100% ensure you never cast to a type that is not the type of the object being cast or one of its parents.

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How do I know something is a NULL pointer? –  0x499602D2 Aug 27 '12 at 23:43
    
Check it. Derived2* myPointer = dynamic_cast<Derived2*>(myPointer); if (myPointer == NULL) ... –  David Schwartz Aug 27 '12 at 23:45
    
Thanks, but why does it turn into a null pointer anyway? –  0x499602D2 Aug 27 '12 at 23:45
2  
@David, nothing "turns into" a null pointer, dynamic_cast returns a null pointer if the cast fails, which happens because myPointer doesn't point to an object of type Derived2 –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 27 '12 at 23:48

Undefined behaviour. Your code violates strict aliasing, even if your implementation was bugged and dynamic_cast didn't return NULL when it should (or if you changed it to static or reinterpret casts) and a bunch of other mean stuff by attempting to perform this functionality. What you observe as output is irrelevant.

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2  
This has nothing to do with strict aliasing, it's undefined behaviour because it dereferences a null pointer. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 27 '12 at 23:46
    
How does the code violate the strict aliasing rules? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 28 '12 at 0:54
    
Because there is no Derived2 object at that location, yet he aliases it with one. So even if he used static_cast, it would still be UB. –  Puppy Aug 28 '12 at 4:09

When you do Derived2::Method(); you are telling the compiler exactly what function to call. This means that it will call it directly. (also, your member function does nothing and does not rely on any member variables, so it is easy to call it directly and doesn't crash because it doesn't access anything). In your first example though, because you did not explicitly tell it which function to call, it has to lookup the function, but since you are calling it on a null pointer, the program crashes.

However, in either case you are invoking undefined behavior, and what I explained above is just an implementation detail, which may differ with other implementations.

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