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I have these classes

class Match
{
  int MatchID,
  int TeamID, //used to reference Team
  ... other fields
}

Note: Match actually have 2 teams which means 2 TeamID

class Team
{
   int TeamID,
   string TeamName
}

In my view I need to display List<Match> showing the TeamName. So I added another field

class Match
{
  int MatchID,
  int TeamID, //used to reference Team
  ... other fields

  string TeamName;
}

I can now do

Match m = getMatch(id);
m.TeamName = getTeamName(m.TeamId); //get name from database

But for a List<Match>, getTeamName(TeamId) will go to the database to fetch TeamName for each TeamID.

For a page of 10 Matches per page, that could be (10x2Teams)=20 trip to database.

To avoid this, I had the idea of loading everything once, store it in memory and only lookup the TeamName in memory. This made me have a rethink that what if the records are 5000 or more.

Is there a better approach for this? Thanks.

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One thing you could do would be to implement paging in your database calls, so you only retrieve the number required for the current page that is being displayed. Then when the 'next' page is clicked, that would be another database call to retrieve next page's data and so on. Each call to the database would include a page number so the database would know which page to retrieve. –  M3NTA7 Aug 27 '12 at 23:39
2  
Have you looked into using MS Entity Framework or NHibernate to manage persistence for you? It will make things a lot easier, let you have a cleaner data model, as well as allow you to fetch related data automatically. –  Pablo Romeo Aug 28 '12 at 0:41
    
I agree with Pablo - the ORM LightSpeed does some fantastic stuff around Eager/Lazy loading. Because machine's have different specs I dont think you'll get the magic bullet solution. Similar to PLINQ you have to try different things to optimise the performance. –  Jeremy Thompson Aug 28 '12 at 4:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Peform your caching per page - put together a list of ids that exist in your current list of 10 matches, and then load up all teams that have one of those ids.

You don't say how you are accessing your data, but if you are using SQL, then IN is your friend.

select * from teams were id in ('1', '2', '3', '4')

Alternatively, you could load up the team with your match in the first place, using a join statement, and then populate the team data at the same time you populate the match data.

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select * is bad practice. –  Ravi Gadag Aug 28 '12 at 4:00
    
Thanks Ravi. Of course it is in many circumstances, but this is only an example. –  Matt Tew Aug 28 '12 at 4:22
    
Your approach is OK. With this I can do one trip, 20 records which is what I want. Thanks. –  codingbiz Aug 28 '12 at 11:47

I would agree with the answers given so far. I was just going to expand on Matt's answer. If you need all that data in your objects it would be more efficient to issue multiple sql statements within a single trip to the database. That would return you multiple tables in a single database hit.

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