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Is the return value of a bash function the status of the last executed command?

I wrote this test and it looks like it's so. I just want to verify. No one has asked this question before apparently and tutorials don't mention this.

Test program:

funa() {
  echo "in funa";
  true;
};

funb() {
  echo "in funb"
  false;
};

funa && echo "funa is true";    
funb && echo "funb is true";

Output when I run the program:

in funa
funa is true
in funb

Does anyone know the answer?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes. Per man bash:

Shell Function Definitions

When executed, the exit status of a function is the exit status of the last command executed in the body. (See FUNCTIONS below.)

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Did you try reading the manpage? It's in there.

When executed, the exit status of a function is the exit status of the last command executed in the body. (See FUNCTIONS below.)

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