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Suppose I have a non-generic List or a List<Foo>, for which you know that all of the elements are of type Bar, which is a subclass of Foo (which will always be the case). Assume that you cannot alter the code that gets you the original list so that you can get a List<Bar> directly. Is there some library or some other thing that assists in "homogenizing" this list?

That is, is there a function in the vein of

public static <T, U extends T> List<U> homogenize(List<T> list, Class<U> subclass);

that I can use somewhere? (homogenize() returns a view of the input list, with functions that take in U rather than T or Object where appropriate. It does not return a copy of the list. If the input list cannot be homogenized - that is, if not all elements are of type assignable to U, then homogenize() returns null.)

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2 Answers 2

If you are looking for a library, my first thought was to use Google Guava Libraries as follows:

public <T, U extends T> List<U> homogenize(List<T> list, final Class<U> subclass) {
    Predicate<T> pred = new Predicate<T>() {
        @Override
        public boolean apply(T input) {
            return input.getClass().isAssignableFrom(subclass);
        }
    };
    return Iterables.all(list, pred) ? (List<U>)list : null;
}

I didn't try it out yet to make sure the kinks are out. However, I looked at it, and decided it was pretty butt-ugly. SLightly better Guava approach is:

public <T, U extends T> List<U> homogenize(List<T> list, Class<U> subclass) {
    Iterable<U> ret = Iterables.filter(list, subclass);
    if (list.size() != Lists.newArrayList(ret).size()) return null;
    return (List<U>)list;
}

However, it's still a bit ugly. And it uses an internal copy of the collection. It does still return a cast view of the original. After all is said and done, the cleanest approach seems to use regular Java:

public <T, U extends T> List<U> homogenize(List<T> list, Class<U> subclass) {
    for( T t : list) {
        if (!t.getClass().isAssignableFrom(subclass)) return null;
    }
    return (List<U>)list;
}

Depending on your aversion to typecast warnings, you could even drop the cast operators in all three options.

EDITS PER COMMENTS The following changes/improvements were suggested in the comments.

Option one improved:

public <T, U extends T> List<U> homogenize(List<T> list, final Class<U> subclass) {
    return Iterables.all(list, Predicates.instanceOf(subclass)) ? (List<U>)list : null;
}

Option two improved:

public <T, U extends T> List<U> homogenize(List<T> list, Class<U> subclass) {
    Iterable<U> ret = Iterables.filter(list, subclass);
    return (list.size() != Iterables.size(ret)) ? null : (List<U>)list;
}

Option three improved:

public <T, U extends T> List<U> homogenize(List<T> list, Class<U> subclass) {
    for( T t : list) {
        if (!subclass.isInstance(t.getClass())) return null;
    }
    return (List<U>)list;
}

With these improvements the 1st Guava example shines quite a bit. If you don't mind static imports, both Guava examples become extremely readable.

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Instead of using isAssignableFrom, couldn't you just cast each element and catch the ClassCastException to return null? –  Antimony Aug 28 '12 at 5:18
    
This will only help you in compile time. In run-time, it might fail. –  Vitaliy Aug 28 '12 at 6:51
    
@KevinWelker: you have your isAssignable() calls backwards, but more simply you can do subclass.isInstance(input), or even more simply use Guava's Predicates.instanceOf(subclass). And in the second approch, you can use Iterables.size() instead of creating a copy. But once you use Predicates.instanceOf(), I think the first one is quite clear. Whether you prefer it or the purely imperative approach is a question of taste :-) –  Frank Pavageau Aug 28 '12 at 8:11
    
@FrankPavageau, I thought subclass.isIntance(parentClass) was the inverse of parentClass.isAssignableFrom(subclass), so I thought what I showed is identical -- although admittedly isInstance is easier to understand. I'll make the suggested changes, thanks. –  Kevin Welker Aug 28 '12 at 21:39
    
In the above, I meant "inverted form" rather than "inverse". –  Kevin Welker Aug 29 '12 at 4:28

Why can't you just cast it?

public static <U> List<U> homogenize(List<? super U> list){
    return (List<U>)list;
}

Note that generics are a purely compile time check. If the types are not what you expect, you will get an exception when you try to cast an object which isn't a bar to a bar.

Edit: I didn't notice that you want it to actually check the type of the contents and return null on failure. If you don't know for sure that the items are the right type and want failfast behavior, you're better off with one of the other approaches.

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