Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have two bytes that are made up of two 4-bit numbers packed together. I need to know if either of the two numbers from the first byte matches either of the numbers from the second byte. Zero is considered null and shouldn't match itself.

Obviously, I can do this by unpacking the numbers and comparing them one by one:

a = 0b10100101;
b = 0b01011111; // should have a match because 0101 is in both

a1 = a>>4; a2 = a&15;
b1 = b>>4; b2 = b&15;

return (a1 != 0 && (a1 == b1 || a1 == b2)) || (a2 != 0 && (a2 == b1 || a2 == b2));

//     ( true   && (  false  ||   false )) || ( true   && (  true   ||   false ))
//     ( true   &&         false         ) || ( true   &&         true          )
//            false                        ||         true
//                                        TRUE

However I'm just wondering if anyone knows of a cleaner way to do this?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A cleaner way would be to get rid of that hard-to-parse expression and make the code more readable.

def sameNybble (a, b):
    # Get high and low nybbles.

    ahi = (a >> 4) & 15 ; alo = a & 15;
    bhi = (b >> 4) & 15 ; blo = b & 15;

    # Only check ahi if non-zero, then check against bhi/blo

    if ahi != 0:
        if ahi == bhi or ahi == blo:
            return true

    # Only check alo if non-zero, then check against bhi/blo

    if alo != 0:
        if alo == bhi or alo == blo:
            return true

    # No match

    return false

Any decent optimising compiler will basically give you the same underlying code so it's sometimes better to optimise for readability.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't that completely identical to my code, just spaced out more? Apart from the additional check to ensure that ah and bh are indeed 4 bits long (unnecessary in my case since they are coming from MySQL TINYINT UNSIGNED fields, but I didn't mention that), I don't see any difference in functionality. By "cleaner", I was more referring to machine-parseability. –  Niet the Dark Absol Aug 28 '12 at 2:47
    
Yes, it is equivalent. My point is that you probably don't need to worry about machine parsability. A machine is more than capable enough of handling your original code. What you need to concern yourself with is the parsability of your code by someone else (or yourself, six months from now). –  paxdiablo Aug 28 '12 at 2:50
1  
That's what comments are for :D –  Niet the Dark Absol Aug 28 '12 at 2:51
    
@Kolink Are you really referring to machine performance when you say "machine-parseability"? –  Michael McGowan Aug 28 '12 at 18:18

Precompute the answer and store it in a lookup table. The key to your table is 16 bits ((a<<8)+b). It need only be 1 bit output (uses 8K), but you could use 8 bits for simplicity (uses 64K).

share|improve this answer
    
Precomputing is a good idea in general, however this call will only be made once in the lifetime of the script. Even if I manually precompute and put the raw results in an array, creating that array would probably be more expensive than just calculating the one result I need. –  Niet the Dark Absol Aug 28 '12 at 2:49
    
You could also use a 256x16bit table and then extract 2 bits: ((table[a]>>(b&15)) | (table[a]>>(b>>4))) & 1. Table is also very easy to compute: table[x] = ((1<<(x&15)) | (1<<(x>>4))) & 0xfffe for x in 0..255 –  Chris Dodd Aug 28 '12 at 2:59
3  
@Kolink: yes, if you only need to do this a few times then using a table lookup is counterproductive. Then what's the problem, exactly? –  Keith Randall Aug 28 '12 at 3:17
    
Precomputing is a space/time tradeoff... but it can backfire, if the lookup table doesn't fit in the data cache (or is used sparsely or infrequently) you might get a cache miss when you do the lookup and going to DRAM can cost you 200 processor cycles - a lot of processing can be done in 200 processor cycles when you hit in the cache. –  amdn Aug 28 '12 at 15:42

Here is a solution in C++ that is more concise and 1.6 times faster. It generates code that is friendlier for high end microprocessors with deep pipelines and complex branch prediction logic. It generates true/false with no comparison/branches and no table lookup (no data cache miss).

A nibble has 4 bits and therefore holds one of 16 values, I map the two nibbles in each of the inputs to an unsigned value (which has at least 16 bits) with bits set in the corresponding bit positions indicating both nibble values present in the input. I then AND the two bitsets, thus computing the intersection of the sets. The last AND discards any matches with nibble 0.

inline unsigned set( unsigned char X ) {
    return (1 << (X & 15)) | (1 << (X >> 4));
}

// Return true if a nibble in 'A' matches a non-null nibble in 'B'
inline bool match( unsigned char A, unsigned char B ) {
    return set( A ) & set( B ) & ~set( 0 );
}

I've timed it on an Intel Xeon X5570 @ 2.93GHz and it is 1.6x faster than the original in the question. Here's the code I used to time it:

#include <time.h>
#include <iostream>

bool original( unsigned char A, unsigned char B ) {
    unsigned char a1 = A >> 4;
    unsigned char a2 = A & 15;
    unsigned char b1 = B >> 4;
    unsigned char b2 = B & 15;

    return (a1 != 0 && (a1 == b1 || a1 == b2)) || (a2 != 0 && (a2 == b1 || a2 == b2));
}

static inline unsigned set( unsigned char X ) {
    return (1 << (X & 15)) | (1 << ((X >> 4)&15));
}

bool faster( unsigned char A, unsigned char B ) {
    return set( A ) & set( B ) & ~set( 0 );
}

class Timer {
    size_t _time;
    size_t & _elapsed;
    size_t nsec() {
        timespec ts;
        clock_gettime( CLOCK_REALTIME, &ts );
        return ts.tv_sec * 1000 * 1000 * 1000 + ts.tv_nsec;
    }
public:
    Timer(size_t & elapsed) : _time(nsec()), _elapsed(elapsed) {}
    ~Timer() { _elapsed = nsec() - _time; }
};

int main()
{
    size_t original_nsec, faster_nsec;
    const size_t iterations = 200000000ULL;
    size_t count = 0;

    { Timer t(original_nsec);
        for(size_t i=0; i < iterations; ++i) {
            count += original( 0xA5 , i & 0xFF );
        }
    }

    { Timer t(faster_nsec);
        for(size_t i=0; i < iterations; ++i) {
            count += faster( 0xA5 , i & 0xFF );
        }
    }

    std::cout << double(original_nsec) / double(faster_nsec)
              << "x faster" << std::endl;

    return count > 0 ? 0 : 1;
}

Here's the output:

$ g++ -o match -O3 match.cpp -lrt && ./match
1.61564x faster
$ 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.