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say I have the following code:

public class Pond
{
  public List<Frog> Frogs { get; set; }
  public List<MudSkipper> MudSkippers { get; set; }
  public List<Eel> Eels { get; set; }
}

public class Frog: IAquaticLife
{

}



public class MudSkipper: IAquaticLife
{

}



public class Eel: IAquaticLife
{

}

Now I want to write a generic method that will for a certain pond return the list of these types:

public IEnumerable<T> GetByPond<T>(int pondId) where T : IAquaticLife
{
   return Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId).Eels;
}

Ok, so what I have there will return all the eels in that pond. What I was wanting to do was to return all the T's.

so if I called GetByPond<MudSkipper>(1) that would return all the mudskippers.

Anyone know how to do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How about something like

public IEnumerable<T> GetByPond<T>(int pondId) where T : IAquaticLife
{
   return from t in Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId).AquaticLife() 
          where (typeof(t) == typeof(T)) select t;
}

or simply (using the approach that @DStanley pointed out before changing his answer)

public IEnumerable<T> GetByPond<T>(int pondId) where T : IAquaticLife
{
   return Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId).AquaticLife().OfType<T>();
}

That requires Uow.GetByID(int id) to return all types of creatures in the particular pond that implement IAquaticLife. The alternative, though, is that you hard-code knowledge of the various implementers of IAquaticLife into your generic method. That is not a good idea.

UPDATE

Currently a Pond has separate collections for Eels, Mudskippers, etc. That becomes fragile if you want to add more things that implement IAquaticLife as your code evolves because you have to change both Pond and the generic method above.

I suggest that instead of separate methods for each type of aquatic life, you instead have a single method that returns everything in the pond that implements IAquaticLife, e.g.

public class Pond
{
    public IEnumerable<IAquaticLife> AquaticLife() { ... }
}

I have updated my code above with this assumption.

Anyone that has a Pond instance and wants to get, say, just the Eels can do this:

var eels = pond.AquaticLife().OfType<Eels>();
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Wouldn't the Pond need to expose a combined list of all its IAquaticLife in order to later be able to filter out by type? –  Pablo Romeo Aug 28 '12 at 3:04
    
Yes. But the alternative is to put type specific code into your generic method, which partially defeats the purpose of a generic method. If you extend your class hierarchy, your generic code breaks if not also updated. Brittle. –  Eric J. Aug 28 '12 at 3:07
    
Oh, I totally agree. I didn't mean to alter the generic method, actually. I was just pointing out that since Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId) returns a Pond, Pond itself will need to be IEnumerable<IAquaticLife> merging all lists, or something similar, to let you filter it. –  Pablo Romeo Aug 28 '12 at 3:18
    
Tried this but doesn't compile. A single Pond is returned by Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId) so it doesn't like the where –  AnonyMouse Aug 28 '12 at 5:56
    
I doesn't make any sense that Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId) returns all the types of creatures in the particular pond. I think Uow should have a new method that does that. –  ivowiblo Aug 28 '12 at 13:05

Try this:

return Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId).OfType<T>();

EDIT

Since you've got the collections in separate properties, you could use either a switch block to return the right property based on the type, or use reflection to get the property based on the type name.

A better design based on your requirement would be to have a private List<IAquaticLife> that would store all of the critters instead of separate properties, but I'll assume that you can't do that right now.

An example of the switch would be:

public IEnumerable<T> GetByPond<T>(int pondId) where T : IAquaticLife
{
    switch(typeof(T))
    {
        case typeof(Eel):
            return Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId).Eels;
        //etc.
        default:
            throw new ApplicationException(string.Format("No property of type {0} found",typeof(T).Name));
    }
}
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It doesn't do what he expects. GetById<Pond>() should retrieve a Pond, not a collection of IAquaticLife –  ivowiblo Aug 28 '12 at 4:53
    
Yeah as ivowiblo says it's not a collection returned so you can't even get access to OfType –  AnonyMouse Aug 28 '12 at 5:55
    
@AnonyMouse: The design should be such that an IEnumerable<IAquaticLife> is returned from GetByID. –  Eric J. Aug 28 '12 at 7:17
    
The EDIT is a bad design pattern in that you are putting concrete type information into a generic method. That breaks as soon as someone creates a new class that also implements IAquaticLife. –  Eric J. Aug 28 '12 at 16:44
public Pond GetByPond(int pondId)
{
    return Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId);
}

If you want your Frogs, do:

var frogs = xxx.GetByPond(1).Frogs;

If you want your MudSkippers, do:

var mudSkippers = xxx.GetByPond(1).MudSkippers;

And so on.

If you can call GetByPond<Frog>(1), you can call GetByPond(1).Frogs.

If in any case you don't know the T, you'll need to create a collection of all of them and filter them by the type. This is also useful if you have intermediate subtype:

public IEnumerable<T> GetByPond<T>(int pondId) where T : IAquaticLife
{
    var pond = Uow.GetByID<Pond>(pondId);
    var life = pond.Frogs.Union(pond.Eels).Union(pond.MudSkippers);
    return life.OfType<T>();
}

But you are concatenating the collections just to filter them.

share|improve this answer
    
That is not what the OP wants. Ok, so what I have there will return all the eels in that pond. What I was wanting to do was to return all the T's. If those were your downvotes on the other answers, might be wise to reverse them. –  Eric J. Aug 28 '12 at 5:27
    
Also, what if someone comes along and implements Salamander : IAquaticLife? Your implementation is then broken. –  Eric J. Aug 28 '12 at 5:31
    
The thing is, this is not what generic is for. And alos the answers didn't solve the posted problem! –  ivowiblo Aug 28 '12 at 13:03
    
I mean, they asume GetByID<Pond>() retrieves all the aquatic life and there's no reason for that. –  ivowiblo Aug 28 '12 at 13:10
    
Your solution is fragile. @DStanley and I pointed out why and provided a better solution. Generics are certainly not for hard-coding all of the involved types in a generic method, which you have done (which is what makes it fragile). –  Eric J. Aug 28 '12 at 16:39

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