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//this is a program to find robotic arm inv kinematics. my doubt is not in kine:-). My program executes but always prints "position unacheivable", even for a known value, it does the same. here I have used radians for angles since thats what c understands. Please tell me how to come across this or even tell me better method to implement this. Thank you.// now, this edited program works but its v slow.. could someone plz suggest a way to optimize this?

#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>
#include<conio.h>
int main()
{
    float a, b, c, d;
    int a1, b1, c1, d1;
    int x = 0, y = 0, z = 0;
    int x1 = 0, y1 = 0, z1 = 0;
    int i = 0, j = 0;
    printf("Enter X value: \n");
    scanf("%d", &x);
    printf("Enter Y value: \n");
    scanf("%d", &y);
    printf("Enter Z value: \n");
    scanf("%d", &z);
    for (a1 = -100 ; a1 <= 100 ; a1++)
    {
            printf("%d \t", j++);
            for (b1 = 0; b1 <= 180; b1++)
        {
            for (c1 = -100; c1 <= 100; c1++)
            {
                              for (d1 = -45; d1 <= 45; d1++)
                      {
                       a = a1 * 0.0174532925;
                       b = b1 * 0.0174532925;
                       c = c1 * 0.0174532925;
                       d = d1 * 0.0174532925;
                               x1 = (11*cos(d+c+b+a)+11*cos(d+c+b-a)+12*cos(c+b+a)+12*cos(c+b-a)+9*cos(b+a)+9*cos(b-a))/2;
                               if(x1 == x)
                               {
                                           y1 =(11*sin(d+c+b+a)-11*sin(d+c+b-a)+12*sin(c+b+a)-12*sin(c+b-a)+9*sin(b+a)-9*sin(b-a))/2;
                                           if(y1 == y)
                                           {
                                                 z1 = 11*sin(d+c+b) + 12*sin(c+b) + 9*sin(b);
                                                 if(z1 == z)
                                                 {
                              i = 1;
                              goto status;
                                                 }
                                            }
                                  }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    status:
    if(i == 0)
    printf("*****Positon unacheivable*****");
    else
        printf(" The joint angles for the desired positon are \n %d \t %d \t %d \t %d \n", a1, b1, c1, d1);
        getch();

}

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closed as too localized by James, amon, Pieter van Ginkel, vwegert, fancyPants Sep 17 '12 at 13:22

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Why don't you add a printf just before goto status to see if your code reaches there? –  Jay Aug 28 '12 at 4:03
4  
Can you share your "known value" with us? An actual input, with your desired output –  Alan Curry Aug 28 '12 at 4:10
1  
Yes, those are details that obviously should have been in the original post. –  David Grayson Aug 28 '12 at 4:14
    
stroustrup.com/bs_faq2.html#void-main –  chris Aug 28 '12 at 4:17
2  
Standing farther back from all the programming details, you're trying to solve a system of equations with a brute-force search over a 4-dimensional space. It looks like a bad algorithm regardless of how well the code is written. I'd ask some mathematicians if there's a closed-form solution. (Since you have 3 equations and 4 unknowns, it should actually be an infinite family of solutions with one free parameter.) If the math is just too hard to work out, a hill-climbing algorithm might be appropriate. –  Alan Curry Aug 28 '12 at 6:03
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3 Answers 3

Read this either first or second, but read it: What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic

0.02 is not representable exactly on most computers. It will be represented approximately. In your loop, every time you add approximately 0.02, your rounding error grows and grows.

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Even if decimal floating point was being used and all the numbers in the program were exactly representable, a loop from -0.784 to 0.784 by steps of 0.02 never hits exactly 0. –  Alan Curry Aug 28 '12 at 5:05
    
k thanks.. any suggestions? :-) –  user1629182 Aug 28 '12 at 5:15
    
Each time through a loop, calculate a, b, c, or d to be as close to the correct value as possible, with a minimal rounding error each time, instead of accumulating with previous rounding errors. Your question looks like homework so you've probably had about the right amount of hints. –  Windows programmer Aug 28 '12 at 5:29
    
is there a way to implement above with degrees in c? –  user1629182 Aug 28 '12 at 5:32
    
@Windowsprogrammer - thanks. but if i multiply with 0.074.... (degree - radian) conversion, wouldnt it take a long time to execute? is there a shorter way? –  user1629182 Aug 28 '12 at 5:36
show 3 more comments

you asked for speed optimization:

you have

for (a...)
   for (b..)
      for (c...)
         for (d...)
            ...
            11*cos(d+c+b+a) + 9*cos(b+a) + 12*cos(c+b+a)
            ...

better would be

for (a...)
   for (b..)
      mybpa = 9*cos(b+a)
      for (c...)
         mycpbpa = 12*cos(c+b+a)
         for (d...)
            mydpcpbpa = 11*cos(d+c+b+a)
            ...
            mydpcpbpa + mycpbpa + mybpa
            ...

sou you do the time consuming calculations as early as possible. You should calculate all of these values when they have reached the level, that they will not change any more inside the next loop. you should even do subtotals 9*cos(b+a)+9*cos(b-a) as soon as they do not change

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(thank you)^ 100 :-) –  user1629182 Aug 28 '12 at 7:10
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Here's a simple hill-climbing algorithm. It starts with a=b=c=d=0, measures the distance to the desired x,y,z and then makes small random adjustments to a,b,c,d and keeps the ones that improve the distance.

It will run forever, except in the rare cases where an exact match is found; it's up to you to pick a stopping condition. It's also up to you to put some boundaries on the randomness if needed to prevent it from choosing a,b,c,d values that are out of the allowed range, since I was too lazy to put that in.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <math.h>

static double getdist(double x, double y, double z,
                      double a, double b, double c, double d)
{
        double x1, y1, z1;

        x1 = (11*cos(d+c+b+a)+11*cos(d+c+b-a)+12*cos(c+b+a)+12*cos(c+b-a)+9*cos(b+a)+9*cos(b-a))/2;
        y1 = (11*sin(d+c+b+a)-11*sin(d+c+b-a)+12*sin(c+b+a)-12*sin(c+b-a)+9*sin(b+a)-9*sin(b-a))/2;
        z1 = 11*sin(d+c+b) + 12*sin(c+b) + 9*sin(b);

        return (x1-x)*(x1-x) + (y1-y)*(y1-y) + (z1-z)*(z1-z);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char *end;
    double x, y, z, a, b, c, d, dist, best;

    if(argc != 4) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Usage: %s x y z\n", argv[0]);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    x = strtod(argv[1], &end);
    if(*end || !*argv[1]) {
        fprintf(stderr, "x value %s is not a number\n", argv[1]);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    y = strtod(argv[2], &end);
    if(*end || !*argv[2]) {
        fprintf(stderr, "y value %s is not a number\n", argv[2]);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }
    z = strtod(argv[3], &end);
    if(*end || !*argv[3]) {
        fprintf(stderr, "z value %s is not a number\n", argv[3]);
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    a = b = c = d = 0;
    best = getdist(x,y,z,a,b,c,d);
    printf("a=%f b=%f c=%f d=%f (dist=%f)\n", a, b, c, d, sqrt(best));
    srand(time(0));

    while(best) {
        double save_a, save_b, save_c, save_d;

        save_a = a;
        save_b = b;
        save_c = c;
        save_d = d;

        a += rand()*1./RAND_MAX*.02 - .01;
        b += rand()*1./RAND_MAX*.02 - .01;
        c += rand()*1./RAND_MAX*.02 - .01;
        d += rand()*1./RAND_MAX*.02 - .01;

        dist = getdist(x,y,z,a,b,c,d);

        if(dist < best) {
            best = dist;
            printf("a=%f b=%f c=%f d=%f (dist=%f)\n", a, b, c, d, sqrt(best));
        } else {
            a = save_a;
            b = save_b;
            c = save_c;
            d = save_d;
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
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thanks a lot and Wow!!! you should be an programming expert but understanding this prog is beyond me now. anyways i ll try hard to comprehend. –  user1629182 Aug 28 '12 at 7:23
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