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Just an idea:

example (in PHP): to set name: $object->name('name'); to get name: $object->name();

If no argument: the method is used as getter, else as setter. For simple getters/setter. Stupid, whatever, maybe?

edit: to follow up on the answers: I don't really like get and set because I prefer to have the interface as explicit as possible. When there are only a few properties it's also overkill IMHO. So I'd like to narrow it down to classes/objects with a couple of explicit getters/setters.

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1  
If you prefer the interface to be as explicit as possible, why are you even considering having one method that does two different things depending on what gets passed to it? –  jeyoung Aug 1 '09 at 13:23
    
Good question. I was hoping that the idea would be clear when confronted with it. Not as clear as having setX/getX but sufficient to trade off a little clarity for a less cluttered interface. –  koen Aug 1 '09 at 17:08
    
I've tried many different methods, and using a function with the same name as the class property is my favourite. __get and __set make the calling code nice but the class code a bit ugly. And there is not much difference between $obj->property and $obj->property(). –  DisgruntledGoat Aug 24 '09 at 12:49
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sure, you could do that if it makes sense in your application, otherwise I would just use the standard getters/setters which have already been set up for you. Your function could look something like this:

public function name($val = null)
{
  if (is_null($val))
  {
    return $this->name;
  }
  else
  {
    $this->name = $val;
  }
}
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I'd like to know the reason behind the downvote. –  koen Aug 1 '09 at 0:38
    
Me too... ;-) –  James Skidmore Aug 1 '09 at 0:47
2  
I wasn't the downvoter, but I'd like to point out that this kind of combined getter/setter doesn't allow you to set the property in question to NULL. –  Otterfan Aug 31 '09 at 21:03
    
Good point Otterfan! –  James Skidmore Sep 1 '09 at 0:19
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The problem is it would be hard to follow. I'd much rather use PHP5's __get and __set so it is more natural to get and set variables, and everyone would know exactly what I am doing. IE:

class myClass
{

    function __get($name)
    {
       return $this->array[$name];
    }
    function __set($name, $value)
    {
       $this->array[$name] = $value;
    }
    function print()
    {
       echo $this->array['test'];
    }
}
$obj = new myClass;
$obj->test = "Hi";
echo $obj->test; //echos Hi.
$obj->print(); //echos Hi.
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It can be done using the __call() magic method.

class Test {
    public function __call($name, array $args) {
        $variable =& $this->$name;
        if(!empty($args)) {
            $variable = $args[0];
        }
        return $variable;
    }
}
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Are you intentionally returning the property for sets? –  hobodave Aug 1 '09 at 0:15
    
Yes . –  moo Aug 1 '09 at 0:16
    
Its probably for brevity, but could be a nice side effect, especially if you put something in there to restrict what variables could be added. –  Tyler Carter Aug 1 '09 at 0:18
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