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in an Apple document regarding nested context it is clearly stated:

Nested contexts make it more important than ever that you adopt the “pass the baton” approach of accessing a context (by passing a context from one view controller to the next) rather than retrieving it directly from the application delegate.

Having a Java background I am used to work with a "pass a copy of the reference" when dealing and passing object. So, could you please provide an explanation of why "pas the baton" approach is strongly recommended.

The link to the doc Core Data Release Notes for OS X v10.7 and iOS 5.0

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Having a Java background I am used to work with a "pass a copy of the reference" when dealing and passing object. So, could you please provide an explanation of why "pas the baton" approach is strongly recommended.

It means the same thing. Apple recommend you pass on a pointer to NSManagedObjectContext from view controller to the next in favor of having a singleton class own the pointer and all view controllers asking it from that class directly (unnecessary strong coupling).

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Thanks, it is not quite clear, for me it looks the same approach if the pointer is the same, and still I don't understand the "more important than ever", seems a mandatory statement. Also, by passing the context, the controllers are coupled to each other, or not ? –  Leonardo Aug 28 '12 at 8:51
    
Well, yes, view controllers in direct sequence to one another are coupled to an extent, but there are real use cases when you might want to swap out the current context. It is easy to do if you pass it along, but how would you do it if the view controller always asks it from the app delegate? Nested contexts encourage you to use a temporary context for detail view controller for example. –  svena Aug 28 '12 at 9:15

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