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The following code leads to "java.lang.IllegalThreadStateException: Thread already started." the second time it is run through on the program.

updateUI.join();    

if (!updateUI.isAlive()) 
    updateUI.start();

This happens the second time updateUI.start() is called. I've stepped through it multiple times and the thread is called and completly runs to completion before hitting updateUI.start().

Calling updateUI.run() avoids the error but causes the thread to run in the UI thread (the calling thread, as mentioned in other posts on SO), which is not what I want.

Can a Thread be started only once? If so than what do I do if I want to run the thread again? This particular thread is doing some calculation in the background, if I don't do it in the thread than it's done in the UI thread and the user has an unreasonably long wait.

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9  
Why didn't you just read th javadoc - it clearly describe th contract. –  mP. Aug 1 '09 at 1:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 56 down vote accepted

From the Java API Specification for the Thread.start method:

It is never legal to start a thread more than once. In particular, a thread may not be restarted once it has completed execution.

Furthermore:

Throws:
IllegalThreadStateException - if the thread was already started.

So yes, a Thread can only be started once.

If so than what do I do if I want to run the thread again?

If a Thread needs to be run more than once, then one should make an new instance of the Thread and call start on it.

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Thanks. I checked the documentation with the IDE and the Java tutorial for threads (and google too). I'll check the API spec in the future. That critical "..never legal to start more than once.." is not in the other readings. –  Will Aug 1 '09 at 1:51
    
@coobird, if I assign the old thread object name to a new Thread(), after the old thread has finished, will the old thread be garbage collected (i.e. is it automatically recycled, or must this be done explicitly)? –  snapfractalpop Apr 5 '12 at 5:17
    
It will be garbage collected, as long as the Thread is no longer running. –  Nate Welch Feb 7 '13 at 20:50

Exactly right. From the documentation:

It is never legal to start a thread more than once. In particular, a thread may not be restarted once it has completed execution.

In terms of what you can do for repeated computation, it seems as if you could use SwingUtilities invokeLater method. You are already experimenting with calling run() directly, meaning you're already thinking about using a Runnable rather than a raw Thread. Try using the invokeLater method on just the Runnable task and see if that fits your mental pattern a little better.

Here is the example from the documentation:

 Runnable doHelloWorld = new Runnable() {
     public void run() {
         // Put your UI update computations in here.
         // BTW - remember to restrict Swing calls to the AWT Event thread.
         System.out.println("Hello World on " + Thread.currentThread());
     }
 };

 SwingUtilities.invokeLater(doHelloWorld);
 System.out.println("This might well be displayed before the other message.");

If you replace that println call with your computation, it might just be exactly what you need.

EDIT: following up on the comment, I hadn't noticed the Android tag in the original post. The equivalent to invokeLater in the Android work is Handler.post(Runnable). From its javadoc:

/**
 * Causes the Runnable r to be added to the message queue.
 * The runnable will be run on the thread to which this handler is
 * attached.
 *
 * @param r The Runnable that will be executed.
 *
 * @return Returns true if the Runnable was successfully placed in to the
 *         message queue.  Returns false on failure, usually because the
 *         looper processing the message queue is exiting.
 */

So, in the Android world, you can use the same example as above, replacing the Swingutilities.invokeLater with the appropriate post to a Handler.

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The OP is asking about threading on Android, which does not include the SwingUtilities. –  Austyn Mahoney Oct 4 '10 at 23:51
    
@Austyn, you're right. I added the remarks about Handler.post() to illustrate the parallel Android code. –  Bob Cross Oct 5 '10 at 14:31
1  
Another way if you are just trying to update your UI is to use RunOnUIThread(Runnable) or View.post(Runnable) instead of creating your own Handler. These will run the runnable on the main thread allowing you to update the UI. –  Austyn Mahoney Oct 5 '10 at 22:06

The just-arrived answer covers why you shouldn't do what you're doing. Here are some options for solving your actual problem.

This particular thread is doing some calculation in the background, if I don't do it in the thread than it's done in the UI thread and the user has an unreasonably long wait.

Dump your own thread and use AsyncTask.

Or create a fresh thread when you need it.

Or set up your thread to operate off of a work queue (e.g., LinkedBlockingQueue) rather than restarting the thread.

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It is as you said, a thread cannot be started more than once.

Straight from the horse's mouth: Java API Spec

It is never legal to start a thread more than once. In particular, a thread may not be restarted once it has completed execution.

If you need to re-run whatever is going on in your thread, you will have to create a new thread and run that.

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What you should do is create a Runnable and wrap it with a new Thread each time you want to run the Runnable. It would be really ugly to do but you can Wrap a thread with another thread to run the code for it again but only do this is you really have to.

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It would be really ugly to do but you can Wrap a thread with another thread to run the code for it again but only do this is you really have to.

I have had to fix a resource leak that was caused by a programmer who created a Thread but instead of start()ing it, he called the run()-method directly. So avoid it, unless you really really know what side effects it causes.

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But the suggestion was not to call run() directly, just to embed a Runnable in a Thread and presumably invoke start(). –  H2ONaCl Dec 19 '11 at 17:39

To re-use a thread is illegal action in Java API. However, you could wrap it into a runnable implement and re-run that instance again.

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