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I was wondering whether use jquery´s getScript or not.

I have a jQuery plugin that I need to include in my site, but I am unsure what to do and I am wondering if there is a difference between these approaches:

In my case, I have to include a rather big script, but only for IE browsers. At this moment I do it like this:

if($.browser.msie){
 //minifed code
}

Now I was wondering if this:

if($.browser.msie){
 $.getScript('link to minified script');
}

would have any advantages/disadvantages? Or if it is more or less the same thing?

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I would take a look at YepNope.js for stuff like this –  Jason Sperske Aug 28 '12 at 8:36
    
Isn't this mainly to be used if you want to roll a 3rd party script into a re-distributable plugin? –  Liam Aug 28 '12 at 8:40
    
go for 2nd option .. read my explanation in answer –  Ashirvad Aug 28 '12 at 8:45
    
@AshirvadSingh It seems there are different opinions on what is faster, so I will try both versions and than mark an answer. –  Andrej Aug 28 '12 at 8:46
    
sure share with us too what you got outta it.. :) –  Ashirvad Aug 28 '12 at 8:50

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There will be disadvantages to getting an external script.

i.e. ONE HTTP request

if($.browser.msie){
 //minifed code
}

TWO HTTP requests

 if($.browser.msie){
 $.getScript('link to minified script');
}

Your browser can only generally cope with 2 http requests at any one time. So from a performance point of view, the first will be faster.

further explanation

with getScript, IE users will have a smaller request, (-the size of your "minified code"). But everyone else will have to download the external script everytime (+ the size of your external script * number of page requests) + delay in response due to extra HTTP request.

with the minified code everyone will have to download your size of your minifed code (+minified code size).

Presuming your minifed code is say 5K and is accessed 10 time that means:

IE GetScript:

(5K * 10) + performance of using second HTTP request = 50K+

Non-IE

0

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

IE nonGetScript

5K

non-IE

5K

share|improve this answer
    
Will the first also be faster for non-IE users? –  Thilo Aug 28 '12 at 8:49
    
It'll be the same one http request –  Liam Aug 28 '12 at 8:50
1  
it'll be the same one http request, but a shorter http response (sans the IE-only code). –  Thilo Aug 28 '12 at 8:51
    
Like @andrea says getscript won't cache your script either, which is bad! –  Liam Aug 28 '12 at 8:53
1  
Thanks for your efforts :) I decided to not use getScript for now and in case i need to include more "plugins" in the future, I might consider yenope (as @Jason Sperske suggested before.) –  Andrej Aug 28 '12 at 9:27

Is better to use:

if($.browser.msie){
 //minifed code
}

because .getScript() will never cache the file.

share|improve this answer
    
Is that true? The source of jQuery appears to be injecting a script tag when you call getScript, if the browser would cache a handwritten script tag why wouldn't it cache an injected one? –  Jason Sperske Aug 28 '12 at 8:43
    
yup: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.getScript/ cache is false. –  Andrea Turri Aug 28 '12 at 8:44
    
the result is exactly the same but I prefere the file to be cached. –  Andrea Turri Aug 28 '12 at 8:45
    
I see, intresting. –  Jason Sperske Aug 28 '12 at 8:47
1  
ye, as Jason Sperske sad: $.ajaxSetup({cache: true }); –  Andrea Turri Aug 28 '12 at 8:54

There is a different between both the approaches. The first approach where you are embedding will download the whole script even if the browser is not ie. It will increase the page size which overhead on performance of your page loads.

The second apporach would be better where you are loading script from external js file only when it is need that means only when the browser is IE. So the performance would be better in other browsers.

Also you mentioned that the script is very big. So it would be better to include that script in external js file. Since these files gets cached in clients machine adding to the performance. No need to fetch it again and again

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So according to the source which you have to drill down a bit you can see that getScript is adding a script tag for you, so there is no difference. Other than the (small) bit of processing to start jQuery and process the JavaScript that adds the script element. I think the big difference is it lets you programmaticly inject the script tag so you can add logic like a browser test.

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There is no need for embedding script in file, users which have another browser should not get it. $.getScript is just shorthand to $.ajax with dataType script, so it just loads script and execute it.

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These are two completely different things. In one case you have your script embedded to the page so it is accessible right away and you don't need any additional code to verify whether it is available or not. However, in the second case you're loading the script as an external resource, which will mean that there can be situations when you will need to process possible errors of communication, script errors etc.

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