Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't get a simple regex replacement to work with sed. Here is the example I'm faced with.

I am trying to replace lines in a file, from this:

select * from mytable where mytable.s_id=274
select * from mytable where mytable.s_id=275
select * from mytable where mytable.s_id=276
select * from othertable where othertable.id=?
select * from table3 where table3.name=?

to this:

select * from mytable where mytable.s_id=?
select * from mytable where mytable.s_id=?
select * from mytable where mytable.s_id=?
select * from othertable where othertable.id=?
select * from table3 where table3.name=?

I am using sed as such for now:

cat log | sed 's/where mytable\.s_id=[0-9]+/where mytable.s_id=/g' | sort

But the regex I am using in sed ('s/where mytable\.s_id=[0-9]+/where mytable.s_id=/g') doesn't replace anything.

I am reading as much documentation as I can, but everything I read is different, with different way of doing things so I am a little lost. What is the canonical way for a regex replacement using sed, and what would it look like in my particuliar case?

Note: I simplified the problem I'm facing. I do want to use sed (to finally learn to use it) and I do want to pipe the input and output (not editing the file in place) because the command line I use is actually more complicated than that.

share|improve this question
    
Is there a space between .s and id, or an underscore? –  nneonneo Aug 28 '12 at 8:45
    
@nneonneo An underscore –  Matthieu Napoli Aug 28 '12 at 8:51
    
You seem to be using GNU sed where + is supported. You either need to escape it by prepending \ or run sed with the extended regular expression switch -r. –  Thor Aug 28 '12 at 9:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
cat log | sed 's/where mytable\.s_id=[0-9]\+/where mytable.s_id=?/g'

Just a backslash before the +.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Why does it need escaping? I find it weird to have to escape a special character, whereas I don't need to escape [0-9]. Do I need also to escape * for example? –  Matthieu Napoli Aug 28 '12 at 9:05
    
Yes you need to escape some special characters as . + and * In fact these characters are interpreted as specification for the regular expression. If you want to learn more of this, try to get a tutorial on the web. –  Timothee Tosi Aug 28 '12 at 9:06

Quote the +:

sed 's/where mytable\.s_id=[0-9]\+/where mytable.s_id=?/g'
share|improve this answer

AFAIK, some sed don't know about the +. Hence, try this:

 cat log | sed 's/where mytable\.s_id=[0-9]*/where mytable.s_id=?/g' | sort

EDIT: the + is a GNU-extension and if you use it (and your sed knows it) you must escape it, like choroba suggested.

share|improve this answer

In case if you are interested in awk

awk -F= '{$2="=?";print}' temp

tested below;

> cat temp
select * from mytable where mytable.s_id=275
select * from mytable where mytable.s_id=276
select * from othertable where othertable.id=?
select * from table3 where table3.name=?
> awk -F= '{$2="=?";print}' temp
select * from mytable where mytable.s_id =?
select * from mytable where mytable.s_id =?
select * from othertable where othertable.id =?
select * from table3 where table3.name =?
share|improve this answer
    
I want to use sed, I emphasized on that in my question –  Matthieu Napoli Aug 28 '12 at 9:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.